2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/12504
Title:
Infant feeding patterns and midlife erythrocyte sedimentation rate.
Authors:
Gunnarsdottir, Ingibjorg; Aspelund, Thor; Birgisdottir, Bryndis E; Benediktsson, Rafn; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Thorsdottir, Inga
Citation:
Acta Paediatr. 2007, 96(6):852-6
Issue Date:
1-Jun-2007
Abstract:
AIM: To assess the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and other coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors in adults who were either breast- or bottle-fed in early infancy. METHODS: Subjects were 3614 men and women born 1914-1935. Information on infant feeding patterns was gathered from original midwife's birth records. Adult ESR, triglycerides, total cholesterol, blood pressure, fasting glucose, weight and height were measured. RESULTS: The number of subjects bottle-fed in early infancy was 186 (5.2%). The geometric mean of ESR was 15.9% (95% CI 1.8%-31.8%) higher in those who were bottle-fed compared with those breastfed, p = 0.026, when adjusting for age and gender. Those who had been breastfed in early infancy had on average 2.9% higher BMI in adulthood (p = 0.012). The hazard ratio for event of CHD for bottle-fed persons versus breastfed was 1.18 (95% CI 0.88-1.57), adjusting for potential confounding factors. CONCLUSIONS: Higher adult ESR, a moderate risk factor for CHD, among those bottle-fed compared to those breastfed in early infancy might indicate a long term anti-inflammatory influence of breast milk.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Link
Additional Links:
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1651-2227.2007.00324.x

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGunnarsdottir, Ingibjorg-
dc.contributor.authorAspelund, Thor-
dc.contributor.authorBirgisdottir, Bryndis E-
dc.contributor.authorBenediktsson, Rafn-
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, Vilmundur-
dc.contributor.authorThorsdottir, Inga-
dc.date.accessioned2007-07-02T12:51:50Z-
dc.date.available2007-07-02T12:51:50Z-
dc.date.issued2007-06-01-
dc.date.submitted2007-07-02-
dc.identifier.citationActa Paediatr. 2007, 96(6):852-6en
dc.identifier.issn0803-5253-
dc.identifier.pmid17537014-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1651-2227.2007.00324.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/12504-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Linken
dc.description.abstractAIM: To assess the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and other coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors in adults who were either breast- or bottle-fed in early infancy. METHODS: Subjects were 3614 men and women born 1914-1935. Information on infant feeding patterns was gathered from original midwife's birth records. Adult ESR, triglycerides, total cholesterol, blood pressure, fasting glucose, weight and height were measured. RESULTS: The number of subjects bottle-fed in early infancy was 186 (5.2%). The geometric mean of ESR was 15.9% (95% CI 1.8%-31.8%) higher in those who were bottle-fed compared with those breastfed, p = 0.026, when adjusting for age and gender. Those who had been breastfed in early infancy had on average 2.9% higher BMI in adulthood (p = 0.012). The hazard ratio for event of CHD for bottle-fed persons versus breastfed was 1.18 (95% CI 0.88-1.57), adjusting for potential confounding factors. CONCLUSIONS: Higher adult ESR, a moderate risk factor for CHD, among those bottle-fed compared to those breastfed in early infancy might indicate a long term anti-inflammatory influence of breast milk.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1651-2227.2007.00324.xen
dc.subject.meshCoronary Disease/blood/*mortalityen
dc.subject.meshBreast Feedingen
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshBottle Feedingen
dc.subject.meshIceland/epidemiologyen
dc.titleInfant feeding patterns and midlife erythrocyte sedimentation rate.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES-

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