2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/12522
Title:
A radiostereometric analysis of the Bryan Cervical Disc prosthesis
Authors:
Lind, Bengt; Zoëga, Björn; Anderson, Paul A
Citation:
Spine 2007, 32(8):885-90; discussion 891
Issue Date:
15-Apr-2007
Abstract:
STUDY DESIGN: Prospective, radiostereometric study of the Bryan Cervical Disc prosthesis (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN) for the treatment of a single-level disc disease of the cervical spine. OBJECTIVE: To study the stability of the titanium endplates of the disc prosthesis at the interface between the bone and prosthesis. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Cervical disc prosthesis is a motion-sparing technology in which the longevity is dependent on initial fixation as well as secondary fixation with bone ingrowth into the surface of the device. Little is known regarding the stability of this fixation with the currently studied prosthesis. METHODS: Eleven patients with symptomatic cervical radiculopathy underwent implantation of a radiostereometry modified Bryan prosthesis after a standard anterior cervical discectomy. The adjacent vertebrae were perioperatively marked with tantalum markers. The patients were then frequently studied with radiostereometric radiographs and evaluated for pain, and neurologic and physical function for 2 years. RESULTS: Both titanium endplates of the device were immediately stable in 5 patients. Small but measurable changes (micromotions) were recorded in 4 patients until the 3-month examination and in 2 patients at the 3-6-month time period. All prostheses continued to be stable after 6 months until the final assessment at 2 years after surgery. The recorded micromotions did not influence the clinical results. CONCLUSIONS: The Bryan prosthesis is immediately stable in many patients and is securely fixed to the bone within 3-6 months in all patients. The result of this study suggests that there is sufficient bone ingrowth on the coated surface of the Bryan prosthesis endplates to stabilize securely the prosthesis.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.brs.0000259925.11230.dd

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLind, Bengt-
dc.contributor.authorZoëga, Björn-
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Paul A-
dc.date.accessioned2007-07-03T11:13:31Z-
dc.date.available2007-07-03T11:13:31Z-
dc.date.issued2007-04-15-
dc.date.submitted2007-07-03-
dc.identifier.citationSpine 2007, 32(8):885-90; discussion 891en
dc.identifier.issn1528-1159-
dc.identifier.pmid17426633-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/01.brs.0000259925.11230.dd-
dc.identifier.otherORT12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/12522-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractSTUDY DESIGN: Prospective, radiostereometric study of the Bryan Cervical Disc prosthesis (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN) for the treatment of a single-level disc disease of the cervical spine. OBJECTIVE: To study the stability of the titanium endplates of the disc prosthesis at the interface between the bone and prosthesis. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Cervical disc prosthesis is a motion-sparing technology in which the longevity is dependent on initial fixation as well as secondary fixation with bone ingrowth into the surface of the device. Little is known regarding the stability of this fixation with the currently studied prosthesis. METHODS: Eleven patients with symptomatic cervical radiculopathy underwent implantation of a radiostereometry modified Bryan prosthesis after a standard anterior cervical discectomy. The adjacent vertebrae were perioperatively marked with tantalum markers. The patients were then frequently studied with radiostereometric radiographs and evaluated for pain, and neurologic and physical function for 2 years. RESULTS: Both titanium endplates of the device were immediately stable in 5 patients. Small but measurable changes (micromotions) were recorded in 4 patients until the 3-month examination and in 2 patients at the 3-6-month time period. All prostheses continued to be stable after 6 months until the final assessment at 2 years after surgery. The recorded micromotions did not influence the clinical results. CONCLUSIONS: The Bryan prosthesis is immediately stable in many patients and is securely fixed to the bone within 3-6 months in all patients. The result of this study suggests that there is sufficient bone ingrowth on the coated surface of the Bryan prosthesis endplates to stabilize securely the prosthesis.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkinsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.brs.0000259925.11230.dden
dc.subject.meshBone Platesen
dc.subject.meshCervical Vertebraeen
dc.subject.meshIntervertebral Disk Displacementen
dc.subject.meshPhotogrammetryen
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshProstheses and Implantsen
dc.subject.meshProsthesis Designen
dc.subject.meshProsthesis Failureen
dc.subject.meshRadiculopathyen
dc.subject.meshSpinal Fusionen
dc.subject.meshTitaniumen
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen
dc.titleA radiostereometric analysis of the Bryan Cervical Disc prosthesisen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES-

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