2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/13046
Title:
Seven-year evolution of discharge diagnoses of emergency department users.
Authors:
Gunnarsdottir, Oddny S; Rafnsson, Vilhjalmur
Citation:
Eur J Emerg Med 2007, 14(4):193-8
Issue Date:
1-Aug-2007
Abstract:
OBJECTIVES: To describe the pattern of main diagnoses of persons discharged home from the emergency department. METHODS: This was a descriptive study, using data from computer records of the emergency department at Landspitali University Hospital Hringbraut in Reykjavik, Iceland, over a 7-year period, 1995-2001. The main diagnoses of those discharged were registered according to the International Classification of Diseases and were transferred to the European shortlist, 'main categories'. Changes in the pattern of discharge diagnoses during the study period (1995-2001) were analyzed by calculating chi for the linear trend in each category. RESULTS: The proportion of users discharged each year increased through the period. In 1995, 54.5% were sent home (not admitted to hospital) and in 2001, 72.5%. Diagnoses in the diagnostic category 'symptoms, signs, abnormal findings, and ill-defined causes', were the most frequently applied to both men and women; this was the classification in more than 20% of cases on average. The most significant change during the study period was the increase in frequency of this category among both men and women. CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of emergency-department users, who are discharged without admission to hospital, increased and exceeded 70% of total cases received. On average, 20% of the discharge diagnoses were in the category 'symptoms, signs, abnormal findings, and ill-defined causes'. The pattern of discharge diagnoses can be assumed to reflect an increased load on the emergency department.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Link
Additional Links:
http://meta.wkhealth.com/pt/pt-core/template-journal/lwwgateway/media/landingpage.htm?an=00063110-200708000-00003

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGunnarsdottir, Oddny S-
dc.contributor.authorRafnsson, Vilhjalmur-
dc.date.accessioned2007-07-31T13:01:15Z-
dc.date.available2007-07-31T13:01:15Z-
dc.date.issued2007-08-01-
dc.date.submitted2007-07-31-
dc.identifier.citationEur J Emerg Med 2007, 14(4):193-8en
dc.identifier.issn0969-9546-
dc.identifier.pmid17620908-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/MEJ.0b013e3280b17ebb-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/13046-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Linken
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To describe the pattern of main diagnoses of persons discharged home from the emergency department. METHODS: This was a descriptive study, using data from computer records of the emergency department at Landspitali University Hospital Hringbraut in Reykjavik, Iceland, over a 7-year period, 1995-2001. The main diagnoses of those discharged were registered according to the International Classification of Diseases and were transferred to the European shortlist, 'main categories'. Changes in the pattern of discharge diagnoses during the study period (1995-2001) were analyzed by calculating chi for the linear trend in each category. RESULTS: The proportion of users discharged each year increased through the period. In 1995, 54.5% were sent home (not admitted to hospital) and in 2001, 72.5%. Diagnoses in the diagnostic category 'symptoms, signs, abnormal findings, and ill-defined causes', were the most frequently applied to both men and women; this was the classification in more than 20% of cases on average. The most significant change during the study period was the increase in frequency of this category among both men and women. CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of emergency-department users, who are discharged without admission to hospital, increased and exceeded 70% of total cases received. On average, 20% of the discharge diagnoses were in the category 'symptoms, signs, abnormal findings, and ill-defined causes'. The pattern of discharge diagnoses can be assumed to reflect an increased load on the emergency department.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkinsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://meta.wkhealth.com/pt/pt-core/template-journal/lwwgateway/media/landingpage.htm?an=00063110-200708000-00003en
dc.subject.meshEmergency Service, Hospitalen
dc.subject.meshInternational Classification of Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshMedical Records Systems, Computerizeden
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.titleSeven-year evolution of discharge diagnoses of emergency department users.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Medical Education and Science, Landspítali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of emergency medicineen
dc.format.digYES-

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