2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/13092
Title:
Bein útgjöld íslenskra heimila vegna heilbrigðisþjónustu
Other Titles:
Out-of-pocket health care costs among population groups in Iceland
Authors:
Rúnar Vilhjálmsson; Guðrún V Sigurðardóttir
Citation:
Læknablaðið 2003, 89(1):25-31
Issue Date:
1-Jan-2003
Abstract:
Objective: Total health expenditures, and out-of-pocket health care costs have increased in recent years in Western Europe and North America. Developments in Iceland appear to be similar. Access and cost are closely related and direct household health care costs often reduce subsequent use of services. The purpose of the study was to consider whether certain population groups spent more on health care than others both in absolute terms and as percentage of household income. Material and methods: The study is based on a national health survey titled Health and Living Conditions in Iceland. A random sample of 18-75 year olds was drawn from the National Register, and the response rate was 69% (1924 respondents). Average household out-of-pocket health care costs (in krónur) and out-of-pocket household costs as percentage of household income were compared between sociodemographic groups. Results: The largest health care expenditure items were dental care, drugs, other drug store items and equipment, and physician care (in this order). The middle aged (45-54), married/cohabiting, parents, large households, full-time employed, and people with high education and income, had the greatest household out-of-pocket costs in absolute terms. However, when considering costs as percentage of household income, women, older individuals (age 55 and older) and the young (age 18-24), the non-employed and unemployed, and low income people were on top. Conclusions: Household out-of-pocket health care costs differ substantially between sociodemographic groups in Iceland. It can be argued and empirically substantiated that out-of-pocket health care costs in Iceland are already at a risky level, affecting access of individuals and groups to health services.
Description:
Neðst á síðunni er hægt að nálgast greinina í heild sinni með því að smella á hlekkinn View/Open
Additional Links:
http://www.laeknabladid.is

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRúnar Vilhjálmsson-
dc.contributor.authorGuðrún V Sigurðardóttir-
dc.date.accessioned2007-08-03T13:48:23Z-
dc.date.available2007-08-03T13:48:23Z-
dc.date.issued2003-01-01-
dc.date.submitted2007-08-03-
dc.identifier.citationLæknablaðið 2003, 89(1):25-31en
dc.identifier.issn0023-7213-
dc.identifier.pmid16819089-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/13092-
dc.descriptionNeðst á síðunni er hægt að nálgast greinina í heild sinni með því að smella á hlekkinn View/Openen
dc.description.abstractObjective: Total health expenditures, and out-of-pocket health care costs have increased in recent years in Western Europe and North America. Developments in Iceland appear to be similar. Access and cost are closely related and direct household health care costs often reduce subsequent use of services. The purpose of the study was to consider whether certain population groups spent more on health care than others both in absolute terms and as percentage of household income. Material and methods: The study is based on a national health survey titled Health and Living Conditions in Iceland. A random sample of 18-75 year olds was drawn from the National Register, and the response rate was 69% (1924 respondents). Average household out-of-pocket health care costs (in krónur) and out-of-pocket household costs as percentage of household income were compared between sociodemographic groups. Results: The largest health care expenditure items were dental care, drugs, other drug store items and equipment, and physician care (in this order). The middle aged (45-54), married/cohabiting, parents, large households, full-time employed, and people with high education and income, had the greatest household out-of-pocket costs in absolute terms. However, when considering costs as percentage of household income, women, older individuals (age 55 and older) and the young (age 18-24), the non-employed and unemployed, and low income people were on top. Conclusions: Household out-of-pocket health care costs differ substantially between sociodemographic groups in Iceland. It can be argued and empirically substantiated that out-of-pocket health care costs in Iceland are already at a risky level, affecting access of individuals and groups to health services.en
dc.format.extent265009 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.languageICEen
dc.language.isoisen
dc.publisherLæknafélag Íslands, Læknafélag Reykjavíkuren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.laeknabladid.isen
dc.subjectHeilbrigðisþjónustaen
dc.subjectKostnaðuren
dc.subjectFjölskyldanen
dc.subject.classificationLBL12en
dc.subject.classificationFræðigreinaren
dc.subject.meshHealth Care Surveysen
dc.subject.meshFinancing, Personalen
dc.subject.meshHealth Care Costsen
dc.titleBein útgjöld íslenskra heimila vegna heilbrigðisþjónustuen
dc.title.alternativeOut-of-pocket health care costs among population groups in Icelanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalLæknablaðiðis
dc.format.digYES-
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