2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/14519
Title:
Contemporary anesthesia ventilators incur a significant "oxygen cost"
Other Titles:
Les ventilateurs d’anesthésie actuels exposent à une importante «dépense d’oxygène»
Authors:
Klemenzson, Gudmundur K; Perouansky, Misha
Citation:
Can J Anaesth 2004, 51(6):616-20
Issue Date:
1-Jun-2004
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Anesthesia ventilators use oxygen or oxygen/air mixtures to drive the bellows during controlled ventilation. As a practitioner may find himself in a situation that the only available oxygen source is a compressed oxygen cylinder, it is important to know the oxygen consumption of anesthesia ventilators during controlled ventilation. METHODS: We tested the Datex-Ohmeda 7900 ventilator mounted on an Excel 210 anesthesia machine under a variety of conditions. For comparison, we also tested the Ohmeda 7800 and the Dräger AV-2 ventilator under control conditions. All experiments were performed using a test lung. RESULTS: The oxygen consumption of the AV-2 and the Datex-Ohmeda ventilators averaged 302 +/- 17 L x hr(-1) and 564 +/- 68 to 599 +/- 56 L x hr(-1), respectively (P < 0.01 AV-2 vs 7800 and 7900). When using an E-type cylinder, this would result in a mean time to alarm of 93 min and 54 to 57 min, respectively. Decreased lung compliance increased the oxygen consumption to 848 +/- 16 L x hr(-1). CONCLUSIONS: Machine-driven mechanical ventilation incurs a significant "oxygen cost." We show that the amount of oxygen consumed by mechanical ventilation with contemporary anesthesia ventilators is influenced by patient-dependent factors and may greatly exceed the amount of oxygen delivered to the patient.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://www.cja-jca.org/cgi/content/abstract/51/6/616

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKlemenzson, Gudmundur K-
dc.contributor.authorPerouansky, Misha-
dc.date.accessioned2007-11-13T10:03:32Z-
dc.date.available2007-11-13T10:03:32Z-
dc.date.issued2004-06-01-
dc.date.submitted2007-11-13-
dc.identifier.citationCan J Anaesth 2004, 51(6):616-20en
dc.identifier.issn0832-610X-
dc.identifier.pmid15197125-
dc.identifier.otherAAA12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/14519-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Anesthesia ventilators use oxygen or oxygen/air mixtures to drive the bellows during controlled ventilation. As a practitioner may find himself in a situation that the only available oxygen source is a compressed oxygen cylinder, it is important to know the oxygen consumption of anesthesia ventilators during controlled ventilation. METHODS: We tested the Datex-Ohmeda 7900 ventilator mounted on an Excel 210 anesthesia machine under a variety of conditions. For comparison, we also tested the Ohmeda 7800 and the Dräger AV-2 ventilator under control conditions. All experiments were performed using a test lung. RESULTS: The oxygen consumption of the AV-2 and the Datex-Ohmeda ventilators averaged 302 +/- 17 L x hr(-1) and 564 +/- 68 to 599 +/- 56 L x hr(-1), respectively (P < 0.01 AV-2 vs 7800 and 7900). When using an E-type cylinder, this would result in a mean time to alarm of 93 min and 54 to 57 min, respectively. Decreased lung compliance increased the oxygen consumption to 848 +/- 16 L x hr(-1). CONCLUSIONS: Machine-driven mechanical ventilation incurs a significant "oxygen cost." We show that the amount of oxygen consumed by mechanical ventilation with contemporary anesthesia ventilators is influenced by patient-dependent factors and may greatly exceed the amount of oxygen delivered to the patient.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCanadian Anaesthetists' Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.cja-jca.org/cgi/content/abstract/51/6/616en
dc.subject.meshAirway Resistanceen
dc.subject.meshAnesthesia, Inhalationen
dc.subject.meshEquipment Designen
dc.subject.meshEquipment Failureen
dc.subject.meshLung Complianceen
dc.subject.meshOxygenen
dc.subject.meshVentilators, Mechanicalen
dc.subject.meshRespiration, Artificialen
dc.titleContemporary anesthesia ventilators incur a significant "oxygen cost"en
dc.title.alternativeLes ventilateurs d’anesthésie actuels exposent à une importante «dépense d’oxygène»en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalCanadian Journal of Anaesthesiaen
dc.format.digYES-

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