Short hospital stay augmented with education and home-based rehabilitation improves function and quality of life after hip replacement: randomized study of 50 patients with 6 months of follow-up

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/14537
Title:
Short hospital stay augmented with education and home-based rehabilitation improves function and quality of life after hip replacement: randomized study of 50 patients with 6 months of follow-up
Authors:
Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Olafsson, Orn; Jonsson, Halldor; Iwarsson, Susanne; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Jonsson, Brynjolfur Y
Citation:
Acta Orthop 2005, 76(4):555-62
Issue Date:
1-Aug-2005
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Because of current cost restrictions, we studied the effect of a shorter hospital stay on function, pain and quality of life (QOL) after total hip replacement (THR). PATIENTS AND METHODS: 50 patients from two hospitals were randomized into a study group (SG) of 27 patients receiving preoperative and postoperative education programs, as well as home visits from an outpatient team, and a control group (CG) of 23 patients receiving "conventional" rehabilitation often augmented by a stay at a rehabilitation center. RESULTS: Mean hospital stay was shorter for the SG than for the CG (6.4 days and 10 days, respectively; p < 0.001). During the 6-month study period, there were 9 non-fatal complications in the SG and 12 in the CG (p = 0.3). The difference in Oxford Hip Score between the groups was not statistically significant before the operation, but was better for the SG at 2 months (p = 0.03) and this difference remained more or less constant throughout the study. The overall score from the Nottingham Health Profile indicated a better QOL in the SG. INTERPRETATION: Our preoperative education program, followed by postoperative home-based rehabilitation, appears to be safer and more effective in improving function and QOL after THR than conventional treatment.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17453670510041565

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSiggeirsdottir, Kristin-
dc.contributor.authorOlafsson, Orn-
dc.contributor.authorJonsson, Halldor-
dc.contributor.authorIwarsson, Susanne-
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, Vilmundur-
dc.contributor.authorJonsson, Brynjolfur Y-
dc.date.accessioned2007-11-12T15:52:57Z-
dc.date.available2007-11-12T15:52:57Z-
dc.date.issued2005-08-01-
dc.date.submitted2007-11-12-
dc.identifier.citationActa Orthop 2005, 76(4):555-62en
dc.identifier.issn1745-3674-
dc.identifier.pmid16195074-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17453670510041565-
dc.identifier.otherORT12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/14537-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Because of current cost restrictions, we studied the effect of a shorter hospital stay on function, pain and quality of life (QOL) after total hip replacement (THR). PATIENTS AND METHODS: 50 patients from two hospitals were randomized into a study group (SG) of 27 patients receiving preoperative and postoperative education programs, as well as home visits from an outpatient team, and a control group (CG) of 23 patients receiving "conventional" rehabilitation often augmented by a stay at a rehabilitation center. RESULTS: Mean hospital stay was shorter for the SG than for the CG (6.4 days and 10 days, respectively; p < 0.001). During the 6-month study period, there were 9 non-fatal complications in the SG and 12 in the CG (p = 0.3). The difference in Oxford Hip Score between the groups was not statistically significant before the operation, but was better for the SG at 2 months (p = 0.03) and this difference remained more or less constant throughout the study. The overall score from the Nottingham Health Profile indicated a better QOL in the SG. INTERPRETATION: Our preoperative education program, followed by postoperative home-based rehabilitation, appears to be safer and more effective in improving function and QOL after THR than conventional treatment.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17453670510041565en
dc.subject.meshArthroplasty, Replacement, Hipen
dc.subject.meshCost Savingsen
dc.subject.meshLength of Stayen
dc.subject.meshPatient Educationen
dc.subject.meshPatient Selectionen
dc.subject.meshPostoperative Complicationsen
dc.subject.meshRehabilitation Centersen
dc.subject.meshQuality of Lifeen
dc.titleShort hospital stay augmented with education and home-based rehabilitation improves function and quality of life after hip replacement: randomized study of 50 patients with 6 months of follow-upen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES-

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