The Stokes-Einstein equation and the physiological effects of vitreous surgery [editorial]

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/20297
Title:
The Stokes-Einstein equation and the physiological effects of vitreous surgery [editorial]
Authors:
Stefansson, Einar; Loftsson, Thorsteinn
Citation:
Acta Ophthalmol Scand 2006, 84(6):718-9
Issue Date:
1-Dec-2006
Abstract:
Removal of the vitreous humour influences the physiology of the eye. The diffusion characteristics of small molecules in the vitreous cavity are changed dramatically by the removal of vitreous gel and its replacement by aqueous humour. This effect is predicted by the Stokes−Einstein equation (Sinko 2006). In vitrectomy the vitreous gel is replaced by water. As vitreous humour is 99% water, the chemical change is not terribly great, but there is an enormous change in viscosity. All liquids possess a definitive resistance to flow; viscosity is a measure of internal flow friction or the resistance of liquid molecules. The higher the magnitude of viscosity, the more resistant the liquid will be to flow. The viscosity of water is 1.00 centipoise (cp) at 20 °, whereas that of vitreous gel is 300–2000 cp (Lee et al. 1992; Soman & Banerjee 2003). The change in viscosity has a major effect on diffusion and thereby on the transport of all substances through the vitreous cavity. The amount (M) of compound flowing through a unit cross-section (S) of a flow barrier in unit time (t) is known as the flux (J):
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1600-0420.2006.00778.x

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorStefansson, Einar-
dc.contributor.authorLoftsson, Thorsteinn-
dc.date.accessioned2008-03-11T11:49:34Z-
dc.date.available2008-03-11T11:49:34Z-
dc.date.issued2006-12-01-
dc.date.submitted2008-03-11-
dc.identifier.citationActa Ophthalmol Scand 2006, 84(6):718-9en
dc.identifier.issn1395-3907-
dc.identifier.pmid17083526-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0420.2006.00778.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/20297-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractRemoval of the vitreous humour influences the physiology of the eye. The diffusion characteristics of small molecules in the vitreous cavity are changed dramatically by the removal of vitreous gel and its replacement by aqueous humour. This effect is predicted by the Stokes−Einstein equation (Sinko 2006). In vitrectomy the vitreous gel is replaced by water. As vitreous humour is 99% water, the chemical change is not terribly great, but there is an enormous change in viscosity. All liquids possess a definitive resistance to flow; viscosity is a measure of internal flow friction or the resistance of liquid molecules. The higher the magnitude of viscosity, the more resistant the liquid will be to flow. The viscosity of water is 1.00 centipoise (cp) at 20 °, whereas that of vitreous gel is 300–2000 cp (Lee et al. 1992; Soman & Banerjee 2003). The change in viscosity has a major effect on diffusion and thereby on the transport of all substances through the vitreous cavity. The amount (M) of compound flowing through a unit cross-section (S) of a flow barrier in unit time (t) is known as the flux (J):en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBlackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1600-0420.2006.00778.xen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshBiological Transporten
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMathematicsen
dc.subject.meshOcular Physiologyen
dc.subject.meshPharmacokineticsen
dc.subject.meshVitrectomyen
dc.subject.meshVitreous Bodyen
dc.titleThe Stokes-Einstein equation and the physiological effects of vitreous surgery [editorial]en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalActa ophthalmologica Scandinavicaen

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