Does the experimental design capture the effects of complementary therapy? A study using reflexology for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/21421
Title:
Does the experimental design capture the effects of complementary therapy? A study using reflexology for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery.
Authors:
Gunnarsdottir, Thora Jenny; Jonsdottir, Helga
Citation:
J Clin Nurs. 2007, 16 (4):777-85
Issue Date:
1-Apr-2007
Abstract:
AIM: Our purpose was to pilot test whether reflexology may reduce anxiety in patients undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery in Iceland. BACKGROUND: Nurses need to study the effects of complementary therapies in general and particularly those that may be beneficial to decrease patients' anxiety. It has been assumed that reflexology lessens anxiety, but research is needed to substantiate such expectations. DESIGN: A pilot study using randomized design with experimental and control groups. METHODS: Nine patients were recruited and randomly assigned into groups with five patients assigned into an experimental group receiving reflexology for 30 minutes and four patients into control group which rested for 30 minutes. Anxiety and physiological variables were measured pre- and post-reflexology sessions once a day over five days. RESULTS: The anxiety scores were lower for patients in the control group on all measures. Systolic blood pressure lowered significantly more in the control group than in the treatment group. No significant changes were observed for other variables. Patients' comments and responses overwhelmingly suggested increased well-being due to both experimental and control intervention. CONCLUSION: This study showed little evidence to support reflexology as a mean of reducing anxiety in CABG patients. Several methodological problems were identified that need to be considered further. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: It is suggested that reflexology should be tailored to individual needs and research methods used that allow for capturing its holistic nature. Further scholarly work is warranted to explore several methodological issues in studying complementary therapies in a highly complex treatment situation.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1365-2702.2006.01634.x

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGunnarsdottir, Thora Jenny-
dc.contributor.authorJonsdottir, Helga-
dc.date.accessioned2008-03-25T11:40:17Z-
dc.date.available2008-03-25T11:40:17Z-
dc.date.issued2007-04-01-
dc.date.submitted2008-03-25-
dc.identifier.citationJ Clin Nurs. 2007, 16 (4):777-85en
dc.identifier.issn0962-1067-
dc.identifier.pmid17402960-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2702.2006.01634.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/21421-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractAIM: Our purpose was to pilot test whether reflexology may reduce anxiety in patients undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery in Iceland. BACKGROUND: Nurses need to study the effects of complementary therapies in general and particularly those that may be beneficial to decrease patients' anxiety. It has been assumed that reflexology lessens anxiety, but research is needed to substantiate such expectations. DESIGN: A pilot study using randomized design with experimental and control groups. METHODS: Nine patients were recruited and randomly assigned into groups with five patients assigned into an experimental group receiving reflexology for 30 minutes and four patients into control group which rested for 30 minutes. Anxiety and physiological variables were measured pre- and post-reflexology sessions once a day over five days. RESULTS: The anxiety scores were lower for patients in the control group on all measures. Systolic blood pressure lowered significantly more in the control group than in the treatment group. No significant changes were observed for other variables. Patients' comments and responses overwhelmingly suggested increased well-being due to both experimental and control intervention. CONCLUSION: This study showed little evidence to support reflexology as a mean of reducing anxiety in CABG patients. Several methodological problems were identified that need to be considered further. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: It is suggested that reflexology should be tailored to individual needs and research methods used that allow for capturing its holistic nature. Further scholarly work is warranted to explore several methodological issues in studying complementary therapies in a highly complex treatment situation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBlackwell Scientific Publicationsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1365-2702.2006.01634.xen
dc.subject.meshAnxietyen
dc.subject.meshCoronary Artery Bypassen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIntensive Care Unitsen
dc.subject.meshMassageen
dc.subject.meshPilot Projectsen
dc.titleDoes the experimental design capture the effects of complementary therapy? A study using reflexology for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Nursing, University of Minnesota, MN, USA. thoraj@hi.isen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of clinical nursingen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Hirsla are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.