Autograft versus interbody fusion cage without plate fixation in the cervical spine: a randomized clinical study using radiostereometry.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/21693
Title:
Autograft versus interbody fusion cage without plate fixation in the cervical spine: a randomized clinical study using radiostereometry.
Authors:
Lind, Bengt I; Zoega, Björn; Rosén, Hans
Citation:
Eur Spine J. 2007, 16(8):1251-6
Issue Date:
1-Aug-2007
Abstract:
A primary object with a fusion cage is avoidance of graft collapse with subsequent subsidence and malalignment of the cervical spine that is observed after bone grafting alone. No randomized studies exist that demonstrate the difference between these two methods in terms of graft subsidence and angulation of the fused segment. The size of the study population was calculated to be 24 patients to reach a significant difference at the 95% CI level. Patients with one-level cervical radiculopathy scheduled for surgery were randomized to anterior discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with autograft or to fusion cage, both without plate fixation. Tantalum markers were inserted in the two adjacent vertebrae at the end of surgery. Radiostereometry was performed immediately postoperatively and at regular intervals for 2 years. Questionnaires were used to evaluate the clinical outcome and an unbiased observer graded the outcome after 2 years. No significant differences were found between the two methods after 2 years in regard of narrowing of the disc space (mean 1.7 and 1.4 mm, respectively) or deformation of the fused segment into flexion (mean 7.7 degrees and 4.6 degrees , respectively). Patients in the cage group had a significantly better clinical outcome. The findings of subsidence and flexion deformation of the fused segment after 2 years seem to be of no clinical importance after one-level cervical disc surgery. However, in multi-level surgery using the same methods, an additive effect of the deformations of the fused segments may affect the clinical outcome.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://www.springerlink.com/content/96174m30674l359k

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLind, Bengt I-
dc.contributor.authorZoega, Björn-
dc.contributor.authorRosén, Hans-
dc.date.accessioned2008-03-27T13:53:12Z-
dc.date.available2008-03-27T13:53:12Z-
dc.date.issued2007-08-01-
dc.identifier.citationEur Spine J. 2007, 16(8):1251-6en
dc.identifier.issn0940-6719-
dc.identifier.pmid17342510-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00586-007-0337-7-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/21693-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractA primary object with a fusion cage is avoidance of graft collapse with subsequent subsidence and malalignment of the cervical spine that is observed after bone grafting alone. No randomized studies exist that demonstrate the difference between these two methods in terms of graft subsidence and angulation of the fused segment. The size of the study population was calculated to be 24 patients to reach a significant difference at the 95% CI level. Patients with one-level cervical radiculopathy scheduled for surgery were randomized to anterior discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with autograft or to fusion cage, both without plate fixation. Tantalum markers were inserted in the two adjacent vertebrae at the end of surgery. Radiostereometry was performed immediately postoperatively and at regular intervals for 2 years. Questionnaires were used to evaluate the clinical outcome and an unbiased observer graded the outcome after 2 years. No significant differences were found between the two methods after 2 years in regard of narrowing of the disc space (mean 1.7 and 1.4 mm, respectively) or deformation of the fused segment into flexion (mean 7.7 degrees and 4.6 degrees , respectively). Patients in the cage group had a significantly better clinical outcome. The findings of subsidence and flexion deformation of the fused segment after 2 years seem to be of no clinical importance after one-level cervical disc surgery. However, in multi-level surgery using the same methods, an additive effect of the deformations of the fused segments may affect the clinical outcome.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer-Verlagen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.springerlink.com/content/96174m30674l359ken
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshBone Platesen
dc.subject.meshDiskectomyen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshMovementen
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshRadiculopathyen
dc.subject.meshRadiographyen
dc.subject.meshSpinal Fusionen
dc.subject.meshSurgical Fixation Devicesen
dc.subject.meshTransplantation, Autologousen
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen
dc.titleAutograft versus interbody fusion cage without plate fixation in the cervical spine: a randomized clinical study using radiostereometry.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalEuropean spine journal : official publication of the European Spine Society, the European Spinal Deformity Society, and the European Section of the Cervical Spine Research Societyen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Hirsla are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.