Renal cell carcinoma in young compared to older patients: Comparison of clinicopathological risk factors and survival

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/21952
Title:
Renal cell carcinoma in young compared to older patients: Comparison of clinicopathological risk factors and survival
Authors:
Thoroddsen, A; Einarsson, G V; Hardarson, S; Petursdottir, V; Magnusson, J; Jonsson, E; Gudbjartsson, T
Citation:
Scand. J. Urol. Nephrol. 2008, 42(2):121-5
Issue Date:
2008
Abstract:
Objective. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is primarily a disease of the elderly, most patients being diagnosed in their mid-60s. However, a significant number of patients are diagnosed at a younger age. The true effect of age at diagnosis on survival has been debated, tumor stage and grade being the strongest prognostic factors of survival. The aim of this nationwide study was to study the significance of young age at diagnosis as a prognostic factor in RCC. Material and methods. This retrospective study included all living patients with histologically verified RCC in Iceland diagnosed between 1971 and 2000 (n=629). Different clinicopathological factors of patients diagnosed aged <50 years (n=99) were compared to those of patients diagnosed aged >/=50 years (n=530). Disease-specific survival was compared and multivariate analysis was used to evaluate prognostic variables. Results. Clinical presentation, TNM stage, grade, tumor size and histological subtypes were comparable between the two groups. Prognostic factors were the same in both groups, most of them having a stronger prognostic value in younger patients. Both 5- and 10-year disease-specific survival was significantly higher in the younger group (66.4% vs 54.5% at 5 years). Conclusions. The clinicopathological profiles are comparable in RCC patients aged < and >/= 50 years. The reason for the more favorable survival of younger patients is not known. Further studies are needed, including studies on possible differences in age-specific host-tumor response.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00365590701571555

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThoroddsen, A-
dc.contributor.authorEinarsson, G V-
dc.contributor.authorHardarson, S-
dc.contributor.authorPetursdottir, V-
dc.contributor.authorMagnusson, J-
dc.contributor.authorJonsson, E-
dc.contributor.authorGudbjartsson, T-
dc.date.accessioned2008-03-31T09:25:49Z-
dc.date.available2008-03-31T09:25:49Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.date.submitted2008-03-31-
dc.identifier.citationScand. J. Urol. Nephrol. 2008, 42(2):121-5en
dc.identifier.issn0036-5599-
dc.identifier.pmid18365922-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00365590701571555-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/21952-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractObjective. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is primarily a disease of the elderly, most patients being diagnosed in their mid-60s. However, a significant number of patients are diagnosed at a younger age. The true effect of age at diagnosis on survival has been debated, tumor stage and grade being the strongest prognostic factors of survival. The aim of this nationwide study was to study the significance of young age at diagnosis as a prognostic factor in RCC. Material and methods. This retrospective study included all living patients with histologically verified RCC in Iceland diagnosed between 1971 and 2000 (n=629). Different clinicopathological factors of patients diagnosed aged <50 years (n=99) were compared to those of patients diagnosed aged >/=50 years (n=530). Disease-specific survival was compared and multivariate analysis was used to evaluate prognostic variables. Results. Clinical presentation, TNM stage, grade, tumor size and histological subtypes were comparable between the two groups. Prognostic factors were the same in both groups, most of them having a stronger prognostic value in younger patients. Both 5- and 10-year disease-specific survival was significantly higher in the younger group (66.4% vs 54.5% at 5 years). Conclusions. The clinicopathological profiles are comparable in RCC patients aged < and >/= 50 years. The reason for the more favorable survival of younger patients is not known. Further studies are needed, including studies on possible differences in age-specific host-tumor response.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00365590701571555en
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Renal Cellen
dc.subject.meshPrognosisen
dc.subject.meshSurvival Rateen
dc.titleRenal cell carcinoma in young compared to older patients: Comparison of clinicopathological risk factors and survivalen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Urology and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Landspitali University Hospital, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalScandinavian journal of urology and nephrologyen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Hirsla are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.