2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/225004
Title:
The role of parental motivation in family-based treatment for childhood obesity.
Authors:
Gunnarsdottir, Thrudur; Njardvik, Urdur; Olafsdottir, Anna S; Craighead, Linda W; Bjarnason, Ragnar
Citation:
Obesity (Silver Spring) 2011, 19(8):1654-62
Issue Date:
Aug-2011
Abstract:
This study investigated the role of parental motivation (importance, confidence and readiness) for predicting dropout and outcome from family-based behavioral treatment for childhood obesity. Parent and child demographics, adherence to treatment, and weight loss parameters were also explored as potential predictors. Eighty-four obese children (BMI-standard deviation scores (SDS) >2.14) and a participating parent with each child started treatment consisting of 12 weeks of group and individual treatment sessions (24 sessions total) delivered over a period of 18 weeks. Sixty-one families (73%) completed treatment and attended follow-up at 1 year after treatment. Child session attendance and completion of self-monitoring records served as measures of adherence. In regression analyses, parent reports (pretreatment) of confidence for doing well in treatment was the strongest predictor of treatment completion (P = 0.003) as well as early treatment response (weight loss at week 5) (P = 0.003). This variable remained a significant predictor of child weight loss at post-treatment (P = 0.014), but was not associated with child outcome at 1-year follow-up (P > 0.05). The only significant predictor of child weight loss at that point was child baseline weight (P = 0.001). However, pretreatment parent ratings of importance of and readiness for treatment did not predict dropout or weight loss at any point. The results underscore the importance of addressing parental motivation, specifically parental confidence for changing lifestyle related behaviors, early in the treatment process. Doing so may reduce treatment dropout and enhance treatment outcome.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/oby.2011.59
Rights:
Archived with thanks to Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGunnarsdottir, Thruduren_GB
dc.contributor.authorNjardvik, Urduren_GB
dc.contributor.authorOlafsdottir, Anna Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCraighead, Linda Wen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBjarnason, Ragnaren_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-21T14:35:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-21T14:35:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-08-
dc.date.submitted2012-05-21-
dc.identifier.citationObesity (Silver Spring) 2011, 19(8):1654-62en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1930-7381-
dc.identifier.pmid21455125-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/oby.2011.59-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/225004-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en_GB
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the role of parental motivation (importance, confidence and readiness) for predicting dropout and outcome from family-based behavioral treatment for childhood obesity. Parent and child demographics, adherence to treatment, and weight loss parameters were also explored as potential predictors. Eighty-four obese children (BMI-standard deviation scores (SDS) >2.14) and a participating parent with each child started treatment consisting of 12 weeks of group and individual treatment sessions (24 sessions total) delivered over a period of 18 weeks. Sixty-one families (73%) completed treatment and attended follow-up at 1 year after treatment. Child session attendance and completion of self-monitoring records served as measures of adherence. In regression analyses, parent reports (pretreatment) of confidence for doing well in treatment was the strongest predictor of treatment completion (P = 0.003) as well as early treatment response (weight loss at week 5) (P = 0.003). This variable remained a significant predictor of child weight loss at post-treatment (P = 0.014), but was not associated with child outcome at 1-year follow-up (P > 0.05). The only significant predictor of child weight loss at that point was child baseline weight (P = 0.001). However, pretreatment parent ratings of importance of and readiness for treatment did not predict dropout or weight loss at any point. The results underscore the importance of addressing parental motivation, specifically parental confidence for changing lifestyle related behaviors, early in the treatment process. Doing so may reduce treatment dropout and enhance treatment outcome.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipLandspitali University Hospital Icelandic Research Fund for Graduate Students University of Iceland Thorvaldssen Societyen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNature Pub. Groupen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/oby.2011.59en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.)en_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAttitudeen_GB
dc.subject.meshBehavior Therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_GB
dc.subject.meshChilden_GB
dc.subject.meshFamilyen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshHealth Behavioren_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshLife Styleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshMotivationen_GB
dc.subject.meshObesityen_GB
dc.subject.meshParent-Child Relationsen_GB
dc.subject.meshParentsen_GB
dc.subject.meshPatient Complianceen_GB
dc.subject.meshSelf Efficacyen_GB
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_GB
dc.subject.meshWeight Lossen_GB
dc.titleThe role of parental motivation in family-based treatment for childhood obesity.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Iceland, Centre of Public Health, Reykjavik, Iceland. thrudur@hi.isen_GB
dc.identifier.journalObesity (Silver Spring, Md.)en_GB

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