Comparative long-term adverse effects elicited by invasive group B and C meningococcal infections.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/225012
Title:
Comparative long-term adverse effects elicited by invasive group B and C meningococcal infections.
Authors:
Gottfredsson, Magnus; Reynisson, Ingi K; Ingvarsson, Ragnar F; Kristjansdottir, Hafrun; Nardini, Martina V; Sigurdsson, Jon F; Schneerson, Rachel; Robbins, John B; Miller, Mark A
Citation:
Clin. Infect. Dis. 2011, 53(9):e117-24
Issue Date:
Nov-2011
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Given the identity between Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MenB) capsular polysaccharide (polysialic acid; PSA) and PSA found on neural cell adhesion molecules, it has been proposed that infection with MenB or vaccination with PSA may be associated with subsequent autoimmune or neurological disease. METHODS: We conducted 2 studies. The first was a retrospective nationwide study of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) in Iceland (with 541 subjects) during the period 1975-2004, and we cross referenced this cohort with databases with respect to subsequent diagnosis of autoimmune disorders. A follow-up study involving 120 survivors of IMD was performed. The study included 70 patients with a history of MenB and 50 patients with N. meningitidis serogroup C (MenC) infection, who served as control subjects. Participants answered standardized questionnaires (Beck's Depression Inventory [BDI] II, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales [DASS], and Patient Health Questionnaire [PHQ]), and serum levels of immunoglobulin (Ig) G against MenB and MenC capsular polysaccharides were measured. RESULTS: The nationwide cohort had 9166 patient-years of follow up. No evidence of increased autoimmunity was found to be associated with MenB, compared with MenC. In the follow-up study, patients were evaluated 16.6 years after the infection, representing 2022 patient-years of observation. Comparable rates of most complications were recorded, but MenC infections were associated with arthritis (P = .008) and migraine headaches (P = .01) more frequently than were MenB infections. No difference was observed with respect to scores on BDI-II, DASS, or PHQ. IgG anti-MenB and anti-MenC capsular polysaccharide levels were not related to patient complaints. CONCLUSIONS: This study does not support the hypothesis that MenB infection may predispose to autoimmunity. MenC infections are associated with a higher prevalence of arthritis and migraine headaches. No evidence of antibody-associated pathology was detected at long-term follow-up.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3189164/?tool=pubmed
Rights:
Archived with thanks to Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGottfredsson, Magnusen_GB
dc.contributor.authorReynisson, Ingi Ken_GB
dc.contributor.authorIngvarsson, Ragnar Fen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKristjansdottir, Hafrunen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNardini, Martina Ven_GB
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, Jon Fen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchneerson, Rachelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRobbins, John Ben_GB
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Mark Aen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-21T13:58:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-21T13:58:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-11-
dc.identifier.citationClin. Infect. Dis. 2011, 53(9):e117-24en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1537-6591-
dc.identifier.pmid21946191-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/cid/cir500-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/225012-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en_GB
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Given the identity between Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MenB) capsular polysaccharide (polysialic acid; PSA) and PSA found on neural cell adhesion molecules, it has been proposed that infection with MenB or vaccination with PSA may be associated with subsequent autoimmune or neurological disease. METHODS: We conducted 2 studies. The first was a retrospective nationwide study of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) in Iceland (with 541 subjects) during the period 1975-2004, and we cross referenced this cohort with databases with respect to subsequent diagnosis of autoimmune disorders. A follow-up study involving 120 survivors of IMD was performed. The study included 70 patients with a history of MenB and 50 patients with N. meningitidis serogroup C (MenC) infection, who served as control subjects. Participants answered standardized questionnaires (Beck's Depression Inventory [BDI] II, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales [DASS], and Patient Health Questionnaire [PHQ]), and serum levels of immunoglobulin (Ig) G against MenB and MenC capsular polysaccharides were measured. RESULTS: The nationwide cohort had 9166 patient-years of follow up. No evidence of increased autoimmunity was found to be associated with MenB, compared with MenC. In the follow-up study, patients were evaluated 16.6 years after the infection, representing 2022 patient-years of observation. Comparable rates of most complications were recorded, but MenC infections were associated with arthritis (P = .008) and migraine headaches (P = .01) more frequently than were MenB infections. No difference was observed with respect to scores on BDI-II, DASS, or PHQ. IgG anti-MenB and anti-MenC capsular polysaccharide levels were not related to patient complaints. CONCLUSIONS: This study does not support the hypothesis that MenB infection may predispose to autoimmunity. MenC infections are associated with a higher prevalence of arthritis and migraine headaches. No evidence of antibody-associated pathology was detected at long-term follow-up.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipEunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health MD-418614 Fulbright Scholarship Hafdis Hlif Bjornsdottir Memorial Funden_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3189164/?tool=pubmeden_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of Americaen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Bacterialen_GB
dc.subject.meshArthritisen_GB
dc.subject.meshAutoimmune Diseasesen_GB
dc.subject.meshChilden_GB
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIcelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshImmunoglobulin Gen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMeningitis, Meningococcalen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshMigraine Disordersen_GB
dc.subject.meshNervous System Diseasesen_GB
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_GB
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_GB
dc.titleComparative long-term adverse effects elicited by invasive group B and C meningococcal infections.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Landspitali The National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. magnusgo@landspitali.isen_GB
dc.identifier.journalClinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of Americaen_GB

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