2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/226897
Title:
Nursing documentation prior to emergency admissions to the intensive care unit.
Authors:
Jonsson, Thorsteinn; Jonsdottir, Helga; Möller, Alma D; Baldursdottir, Lovísa
Citation:
Nurs. Crit. Care 2011, 16(4):164-9
Issue Date:
31-May-2012
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Early identification of prodromal signs of acute deterioration of patients is essential in high quality care. Rigorous monitoring of patients is facilitated by risk assessment tools, e.g. the Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS). AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the study was to estimate the accuracy of nursing documentation according to parameters that comprise MEWS in patients prior to emergency admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: The research design was retrospective and descriptive. Data was collected from medical records of in-patients who presented as emergency admission to two ICUs at a university hospital between 1 October and 31 December 2006. RESULTS: Data was collected from 65 patients' records over the 3-month period. Most admissions occurred between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. Respiratory failure was the primary reason for admission, followed by septic shock. Respiratory rate was documented for 14% of patients (n = 9) prior to ICU admission, which was the least documented observation. Urine output and fluid balance were documented for 40% of the patients, level of consciousness in 48% of patients (n = 31), temperature for 69% (n = 45) and oxygen saturation for 80% of the patients (n = 53). DISCUSSION: Respiratory failure was the primary cause of emergency admission of in-patients to the ICUs with respiratory rate the least documented vital sign. Nursing documentation according to the MEWS was insufficient. CONCLUSIONS/RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nurses need to be alerted to the necessity of documenting early signs of deterioration of patients, particularly the respiratory rate. With better monitoring and documentation of physiological parameters, emergency admission to the ICU might be avoided.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1478-5153.2011.00427.x
Rights:
Archived with thanks to Nursing in critical care

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJonsson, Thorsteinnen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJonsdottir, Helgaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMöller, Alma Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorBaldursdottir, Lovísaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-31T13:47:09Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-31T13:47:09Z-
dc.date.issued2012-05-31-
dc.date.submitted2012-05-31-
dc.identifier.citationNurs. Crit. Care 2011, 16(4):164-9en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1478-5153-
dc.identifier.pmid21651656-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1478-5153.2011.00427.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/226897-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en_GB
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Early identification of prodromal signs of acute deterioration of patients is essential in high quality care. Rigorous monitoring of patients is facilitated by risk assessment tools, e.g. the Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS). AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the study was to estimate the accuracy of nursing documentation according to parameters that comprise MEWS in patients prior to emergency admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: The research design was retrospective and descriptive. Data was collected from medical records of in-patients who presented as emergency admission to two ICUs at a university hospital between 1 October and 31 December 2006. RESULTS: Data was collected from 65 patients' records over the 3-month period. Most admissions occurred between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. Respiratory failure was the primary reason for admission, followed by septic shock. Respiratory rate was documented for 14% of patients (n = 9) prior to ICU admission, which was the least documented observation. Urine output and fluid balance were documented for 40% of the patients, level of consciousness in 48% of patients (n = 31), temperature for 69% (n = 45) and oxygen saturation for 80% of the patients (n = 53). DISCUSSION: Respiratory failure was the primary cause of emergency admission of in-patients to the ICUs with respiratory rate the least documented vital sign. Nursing documentation according to the MEWS was insufficient. CONCLUSIONS/RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nurses need to be alerted to the necessity of documenting early signs of deterioration of patients, particularly the respiratory rate. With better monitoring and documentation of physiological parameters, emergency admission to the ICU might be avoided.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBritish Association of Critical Care Nursesen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1478-5153.2011.00427.xen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Nursing in critical careen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_GB
dc.subject.meshEmergenciesen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIcelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshIntensive Care Unitsen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshNursing Assessmenten_GB
dc.subject.meshNursing Recordsen_GB
dc.subject.meshPatient Admissionen_GB
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Rateen_GB
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshRisk Assessmenten_GB
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_GB
dc.titleNursing documentation prior to emergency admissions to the intensive care unit.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Health Sciences, Faculty of Nursing, University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital, Iceland. thorsj@hi.isen_GB
dc.identifier.journalNursing in critical careen_GB

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