The scope of early traumatic brain injury as a long-term health concern in two nationwide samples: prevalence and prognostic factors.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/238423
Title:
The scope of early traumatic brain injury as a long-term health concern in two nationwide samples: prevalence and prognostic factors.
Authors:
Halldorsson, Jonas G; Flekkoy, Kjell M; Arnkelsson, Gudmundur B; Tomasson, Kristinn; Magnadottir, Hulda Bra; Arnarson, Eirikur Orn
Citation:
Brain Inj. 2012, 26(1):1-13
Issue Date:
2012
Abstract:
To examine the scope of paediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) as a health concern and to identify prognostic factors for TBI-related sequelae. The study was prospective and nationwide. A questionnaire was sent to a study group (SG) of all 0-19 years old in Iceland, diagnosed ∼16 years earlier with TBI during a 1-year period, 1992-1993 (n = 550) and to a control group (CG) (n = 1232), selected from the National Register. In the CG 49.5% reported having sustained TBI and 7.0% reported long-term disability. In the group with TBI, force of impact to the head, more than one incident of TBI and the injury severity by gender interaction predicted late symptoms. TBI severity had substantially less effect than force of impact and was close to non-existent for females. Based on two independent nationwide samples, the scope of TBI as a health concern in adolescence and young adulthood is greater than previously documented. The findings suggest that TBI event-related factors, especially force of impact, have greater predictive value than clinical symptoms of severity at the acute stage, females being more sensitive to the effects of mild TBI than males.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/02699052.2011.635359
Rights:
Archived with thanks to Brain injury : [BI]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHalldorsson, Jonas Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFlekkoy, Kjell Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorArnkelsson, Gudmundur Ben_GB
dc.contributor.authorTomasson, Kristinnen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMagnadottir, Hulda Braen_GB
dc.contributor.authorArnarson, Eirikur Ornen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-14T11:51:58Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-14T11:51:58Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.date.submitted2012-08-14-
dc.identifier.citationBrain Inj. 2012, 26(1):1-13en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1362-301X-
dc.identifier.pmid22149441-
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/02699052.2011.635359-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/238423-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en_GB
dc.description.abstractTo examine the scope of paediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) as a health concern and to identify prognostic factors for TBI-related sequelae. The study was prospective and nationwide. A questionnaire was sent to a study group (SG) of all 0-19 years old in Iceland, diagnosed ∼16 years earlier with TBI during a 1-year period, 1992-1993 (n = 550) and to a control group (CG) (n = 1232), selected from the National Register. In the CG 49.5% reported having sustained TBI and 7.0% reported long-term disability. In the group with TBI, force of impact to the head, more than one incident of TBI and the injury severity by gender interaction predicted late symptoms. TBI severity had substantially less effect than force of impact and was close to non-existent for females. Based on two independent nationwide samples, the scope of TBI as a health concern in adolescence and young adulthood is greater than previously documented. The findings suggest that TBI event-related factors, especially force of impact, have greater predictive value than clinical symptoms of severity at the acute stage, females being more sensitive to the effects of mild TBI than males.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipStatistics Iceland, Icelandic Directorate of Health, Landspitali University Hospital, University of Iceland, Margret Bjorgolfsdottir memorial fund, Olafia Jonsdottir memorial fund, Helga Jonsdottir and Sigurlidi Kristjansson memorial fund, Alcan in Iceland communityen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3109/02699052.2011.635359en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Brain injury : [BI]en_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshBrain Injuriesen_GB
dc.subject.meshChilden_GB
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_GB
dc.subject.meshDisabled Personsen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHeadache Disordersen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIcelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshInfanten_GB
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshPainen_GB
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_GB
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_GB
dc.subject.meshRecovery of Functionen_GB
dc.subject.meshRegistriesen_GB
dc.subject.meshSeverity of Illness Indexen_GB
dc.subject.meshSex Distributionen_GB
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_GB
dc.titleThe scope of early traumatic brain injury as a long-term health concern in two nationwide samples: prevalence and prognostic factors.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentLandspitali The National University Hospital, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Icelanden_GB
dc.identifier.journalBrain injury : [BI]en_GB
dc.rights.accessClosed - Lokaðen
dc.type.categorySálfræðingaren_GB
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