Dietary fish oil decreases the proportion of classical monocytes in blood in healthy mice but increases their proportion upon induction of inflammation.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/240152
Title:
Dietary fish oil decreases the proportion of classical monocytes in blood in healthy mice but increases their proportion upon induction of inflammation.
Authors:
Arnardottir, Hildur H; Freysdottir, Jona; Hardardottir, Ingibjorg
Citation:
J. Nutr. 2012, 142(4):803-8
Issue Date:
Apr-2012
Abstract:
Fish oil can have beneficial effects in health and disease. In healthy individuals, reduction of the inflammatory status may be of benefit, whereas in patients with systemic inflammation, such as sepsis, it is important to diminish the immunosuppression that is thought to contribute to poor outcome. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of dietary fish oil on monocytes/macrophages in blood, bone marrow, spleen, and peritoneum and chemokine concentrations in blood and peritoneum in healthy mice and mice with endotoxin-induced inflammation. Mice were fed a Western-type diet without fish oil (C) or with 2.8% fish oil (FO) for 6 wk and then either killed (healthy mice) or injected i.p. with endotoxin (LPS) and killed after 3, 8, 12, 24, or 48 h. Blood, bone marrow, spleen, and peritoneal lavage were collected. Expression of cell surface molecules and chemokine receptors was analyzed by flow cytometry and chemokine concentrations measured by ELISA. Healthy mice in the FO group had lower proportions of classical monocytes in blood than healthy mice in the C group. LPS administration increased the proportion of classical monocytes in blood in mice in the FO group but not in those in the C group. Healthy mice in the FO group had lower serum concentrations of CCL2 than mice in the C group, but in inflamed mice, CCL2 concentrations were higher in the FO group than in the C group. These results indicate that dietary fish oil can attenuate the inflammatory status in homeostasis but intensify the immune response upon inflammation.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.3945/jn.111.153221

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorArnardottir, Hildur Hen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFreysdottir, Jonaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHardardottir, Ingibjorgen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-28T08:53:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-28T08:53:54Z-
dc.date.issued2012-04-
dc.date.submitted2012-08-28-
dc.identifier.citationJ. Nutr. 2012, 142(4):803-8en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1541-6100-
dc.identifier.pmid22378326-
dc.identifier.doi10.3945/jn.111.153221-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/240152-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en_GB
dc.description.abstractFish oil can have beneficial effects in health and disease. In healthy individuals, reduction of the inflammatory status may be of benefit, whereas in patients with systemic inflammation, such as sepsis, it is important to diminish the immunosuppression that is thought to contribute to poor outcome. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of dietary fish oil on monocytes/macrophages in blood, bone marrow, spleen, and peritoneum and chemokine concentrations in blood and peritoneum in healthy mice and mice with endotoxin-induced inflammation. Mice were fed a Western-type diet without fish oil (C) or with 2.8% fish oil (FO) for 6 wk and then either killed (healthy mice) or injected i.p. with endotoxin (LPS) and killed after 3, 8, 12, 24, or 48 h. Blood, bone marrow, spleen, and peritoneal lavage were collected. Expression of cell surface molecules and chemokine receptors was analyzed by flow cytometry and chemokine concentrations measured by ELISA. Healthy mice in the FO group had lower proportions of classical monocytes in blood than healthy mice in the C group. LPS administration increased the proportion of classical monocytes in blood in mice in the FO group but not in those in the C group. Healthy mice in the FO group had lower serum concentrations of CCL2 than mice in the C group, but in inflamed mice, CCL2 concentrations were higher in the FO group than in the C group. These results indicate that dietary fish oil can attenuate the inflammatory status in homeostasis but intensify the immune response upon inflammation.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipIcelandic Research Fund, University of Iceland,en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Nutritional Sciencesen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3945/jn.111.153221en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The Journal of nutritionen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_GB
dc.subject.meshBone Marrowen_GB
dc.subject.meshCell Counten_GB
dc.subject.meshChemokine CCL2en_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshFish Oilsen_GB
dc.subject.meshImmunomodulationen_GB
dc.subject.meshInflammationen_GB
dc.subject.meshLipopolysaccharidesen_GB
dc.subject.meshMacrophagesen_GB
dc.subject.meshMacrophages, Peritonealen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiceen_GB
dc.subject.meshMice, Inbred C57BLen_GB
dc.subject.meshMonocytesen_GB
dc.subject.meshPeritoneal Cavityen_GB
dc.subject.meshRandom Allocationen_GB
dc.subject.meshSeverity of Illness Indexen_GB
dc.subject.meshSpleenen_GB
dc.titleDietary fish oil decreases the proportion of classical monocytes in blood in healthy mice but increases their proportion upon induction of inflammation.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentLandspitali The National University Hospital, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of nutritionen_GB
dc.rights.accessLandspitali Access - LSH-aðganguren
dc.type.categoryÓnæmisfræðien_GB
dc.type.categoryLífeindafræðingar-
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