2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/249371
Title:
Obesity and the risk of psoriatic arthritis: a population-based study.
Authors:
Love, Thorvardur Jon; Zhu, Yanyan; Zhang, Yuqing; Wall-Burns, Lindsay; Ogdie, Alexis; Gelfand, Joel M; Choi, Hyon K
Citation:
Ann. Rheum. Dis. 2012, 71(8):1273-7
Issue Date:
Aug-2012
Abstract:
Obesity is associated with an increased risk of psoriasis; however, its potential impact on the risk of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) remains unclear. To evaluate the association between body mass index (BMI) and the risk of PsA among patients with psoriasis from the general population. The authors conducted a cohort study using data from The Health Improvement Network, an electronic medical records database representative of the UK general population, collected between 1995 and 2010. The exposure of interest was the first BMI measured after psoriasis diagnosis and endpoints were incident cases of physician-diagnosed PsA. The authors estimated the RR of PsA after adjusting for age, sex, and histories of trauma, smoking and alcohol consumption. Among 75,395 individuals with psoriasis (43% male, mean follow-up of 5 years, and mean age of 52 years), 976 developed PsA (incidence rate, 26.5 per 10,000 person-years). The PsA incidence rates increased with increasing BMI. Compared with psoriasis patients with BMI <25 kg/m(2), the RRs for developing PsA were 1.09 (0.93-1.28) for BMIs from 25.0 to 29.9, 1.22 (1.02-1.47) for BMIs from 30.0 to 34.9 and 1.48 (1.20-1.81) for BMIs ≥35.0. In our secondary analysis among all individuals, regardless of psoriasis (~2 million), the corresponding multivariate RRs tended to be stronger (1.0, 1.17, 1.57, 1.96; p for trend <0.001). This general population study suggests that obesity is associated with an increased risk of incident PsA and supports the importance of weight reduction among psoriasis patients who often suffer from the metabolic syndrome and obesity.
Description:
To access full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink "View/open" at the bottom of this page
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2012-201299
Rights:
Archived with thanks to Annals of the rheumatic diseases

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLove, Thorvardur Jonen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Yanyanen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yuqingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWall-Burns, Lindsayen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOgdie, Alexisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGelfand, Joel Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorChoi, Hyon Ken_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-18T11:38:58Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-18T11:38:58Z-
dc.date.issued2012-08-
dc.date.submitted2012-10-18-
dc.identifier.citationAnn. Rheum. Dis. 2012, 71(8):1273-7en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1468-2060-
dc.identifier.pmid22586165-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/annrheumdis-2012-201299-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/249371-
dc.descriptionTo access full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink "View/open" at the bottom of this pageen_GB
dc.description.abstractObesity is associated with an increased risk of psoriasis; however, its potential impact on the risk of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) remains unclear. To evaluate the association between body mass index (BMI) and the risk of PsA among patients with psoriasis from the general population. The authors conducted a cohort study using data from The Health Improvement Network, an electronic medical records database representative of the UK general population, collected between 1995 and 2010. The exposure of interest was the first BMI measured after psoriasis diagnosis and endpoints were incident cases of physician-diagnosed PsA. The authors estimated the RR of PsA after adjusting for age, sex, and histories of trauma, smoking and alcohol consumption. Among 75,395 individuals with psoriasis (43% male, mean follow-up of 5 years, and mean age of 52 years), 976 developed PsA (incidence rate, 26.5 per 10,000 person-years). The PsA incidence rates increased with increasing BMI. Compared with psoriasis patients with BMI <25 kg/m(2), the RRs for developing PsA were 1.09 (0.93-1.28) for BMIs from 25.0 to 29.9, 1.22 (1.02-1.47) for BMIs from 30.0 to 34.9 and 1.48 (1.20-1.81) for BMIs ≥35.0. In our secondary analysis among all individuals, regardless of psoriasis (~2 million), the corresponding multivariate RRs tended to be stronger (1.0, 1.17, 1.57, 1.96; p for trend <0.001). This general population study suggests that obesity is associated with an increased risk of incident PsA and supports the importance of weight reduction among psoriasis patients who often suffer from the metabolic syndrome and obesity.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipNIAMS P60AR047785 Boston University School of Medicineen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2012-201299en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Annals of the rheumatic diseasesen_GB
dc.subject.meshArthritis, Psoriaticen_GB
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_GB
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshComorbidityen_GB
dc.subject.meshDatabases, Factualen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshObesityen_GB
dc.subject.meshPopulation Surveillanceen_GB
dc.subject.meshRisk Assessmenten_GB
dc.subject.meshUnited Statesen_GB
dc.titleObesity and the risk of psoriatic arthritis: a population-based study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Science, Education, and Innovation, Landspitali University Hospital, Fossvogur, Reykjavik, Iceland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalAnnals of the rheumatic diseasesen_GB
dc.rights.accessLandspitali Access - LSH-aðganguren
dc.type.categoryVMN, ónæmisfræðien_GB

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