Mannan binding lectin as an adjunct to risk assessment for myocardial infarction in individuals with enhanced risk

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/2688
Title:
Mannan binding lectin as an adjunct to risk assessment for myocardial infarction in individuals with enhanced risk
Authors:
Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Oskarsson, Oskar Orn; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Vikingsdottir, Thora; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Valdimarsson, Helgi
Citation:
J. Exp. Med. 2005, 201(1):117-25
Issue Date:
Jan-2005
Abstract:
Inflammation can predispose to myocardial infarction (MI), and mannan binding lectin (MBL) promotes phagocytic clearance of inflammatory agents, but the predictive value of MBL levels for MI is not known. MBL was analyzed in subgroups of the population-based Reykjavik study, a cohort of 19,381 participants recruited from 1967. MBL levels were very stable over time (self correlation: 0.86). In a cross-sectional group from the original cohort (n = 987), high MBL (>1,000 microg/L) was associated with a greatly lowered odds ratio for MI (0.64, P < 0.001). To verify this finding, a nested case control sample (n = 1,309) was randomly selected from the cohort. High MBL at recruitment was also associated with decreased MI risk in this follow-up group, but to a lesser extent and not significant for the whole group, smokers, or hypertensive individuals. However, high MBL was as in the cross-sectional group, associated with greatly decreased MI risk in diabetic (P = 0.02) or hypercholesterolemic individuals (P = 0.004). This also applied to raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate (P = 0.007). Diabetic patients with high MBL did not have a higher MI risk than nondiabetic individuals. Our findings indicate that high MBL may predict decreased likelihood of MI, particularly in diabetics, and are consistent with the possibility that MBL may promote clearance of atherogenic agents.
Description:
To access full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink "View/Open" at the bottom of this page; To access publisher version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Link field
Additional Links:
http://www.jem.org/cgi/reprint/201/1/117

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSaevarsdottir, Saedis-
dc.contributor.authorOskarsson, Oskar Orn-
dc.contributor.authorAspelund, Thor-
dc.contributor.authorEiriksdottir, Gudny-
dc.contributor.authorVikingsdottir, Thora-
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, Vilmundur-
dc.contributor.authorValdimarsson, Helgi-
dc.date.accessioned2006-05-16T12:15:24Z-
dc.date.available2006-05-16T12:15:24Z-
dc.date.issued2005-01-
dc.identifier.citationJ. Exp. Med. 2005, 201(1):117-25en
dc.identifier.issn0022-1007-
dc.identifier.pmid15623574-
dc.identifier.doi10.1084/jem.20041431-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/2688-
dc.descriptionTo access full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink "View/Open" at the bottom of this pageen
dc.descriptionTo access publisher version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Link fielden
dc.description.abstractInflammation can predispose to myocardial infarction (MI), and mannan binding lectin (MBL) promotes phagocytic clearance of inflammatory agents, but the predictive value of MBL levels for MI is not known. MBL was analyzed in subgroups of the population-based Reykjavik study, a cohort of 19,381 participants recruited from 1967. MBL levels were very stable over time (self correlation: 0.86). In a cross-sectional group from the original cohort (n = 987), high MBL (>1,000 microg/L) was associated with a greatly lowered odds ratio for MI (0.64, P < 0.001). To verify this finding, a nested case control sample (n = 1,309) was randomly selected from the cohort. High MBL at recruitment was also associated with decreased MI risk in this follow-up group, but to a lesser extent and not significant for the whole group, smokers, or hypertensive individuals. However, high MBL was as in the cross-sectional group, associated with greatly decreased MI risk in diabetic (P = 0.02) or hypercholesterolemic individuals (P = 0.004). This also applied to raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate (P = 0.007). Diabetic patients with high MBL did not have a higher MI risk than nondiabetic individuals. Our findings indicate that high MBL may predict decreased likelihood of MI, particularly in diabetics, and are consistent with the possibility that MBL may promote clearance of atherogenic agents.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRockefeller University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.jem.org/cgi/reprint/201/1/117en
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectAged, 80 and overen
dc.subjectCase-Control Studiesen
dc.subjectCohort Studiesen
dc.subjectComparative Studyen
dc.subjectCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subjectDiabetes Complicationsen
dc.subjectEnzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assayen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectHypercholesterolemiaen
dc.subjectHypertensionen
dc.subjectIceland/epidemiologyen
dc.subjectInterviewsen
dc.subjectLogistic Modelsen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMannose-Binding Lectinen
dc.subjectMyocardial Infarctionen
dc.subjectRisk Assessmenten
dc.subjectSmoking/metabolismen
dc.titleMannan binding lectin as an adjunct to risk assessment for myocardial infarction in individuals with enhanced risken
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of experimental medicineen
dc.format.digYES-

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