Exclusive characteristics of graft survival and risk factors in recipients with immunoglobulin A nephropathy: a retrospective analysis of registry data

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/2756
Title:
Exclusive characteristics of graft survival and risk factors in recipients with immunoglobulin A nephropathy: a retrospective analysis of registry data
Authors:
Andresdottir, Margret B; Haasnoot, Geert W; Doxiadis, Ilias I N; Persijn, Guido G; Claas, Frans H J
Citation:
Transplantation 2005, 80(8):1012-8
Issue Date:
27-Oct-2005
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Some studies have claimed that patients with immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy have better graft survival than other renal graft recipients, whereas others have rejected this statement. We have addressed this paradox in the present study. METHODS: In all, 1,207 patients with IgA nephropathy who received a primary cadaveric renal graft from 1990 to 2002 were identified in the Eurotransplant database. For comparison, we analyzed 7,935 patients with nonglomerular diseases. Death-censored graft survival was calculated using Kaplan Meier estimates and a multivariable Cox regression analysis was used for risk calculations. RESULTS: Death-censored graft survival was superior in patients with IgA nephropathy in the first period after transplantation. After 3 years posttransplant, however, there was an accelerated decline in graft survival in recipients with IgA nephropathy. The fully adjusted risk of graft loss in the first year was increased by 40% in the control group compared to IgA nephropathy (hazard ratio [HR] 1.40, 95% CI 1.12-1.75), whereas the risk was significantly lower in the control group after the first year posttransplant (HR 0.75, 95% CI 0.63-0.88). Cold ischemia time, immunization and HLA-DR mismatch were risk factors for graft loss in the control group but not for IgA nephropathy, whereas HLA-AB mismatch was an independent risk factor, exclusively for the IgA nephropathy group. CONCLUSIONS: Recipients with IgA nephropathy have better 1-year graft survival, presumably due to favorable immunological behavior. This benefit was however abolished in the long-term by increased graft loss with time. Studies are needed to explain the difference in graft survival and the reason why different risk factors are involved in graft failure.
Description:
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Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAndresdottir, Margret B-
dc.contributor.authorHaasnoot, Geert W-
dc.contributor.authorDoxiadis, Ilias I N-
dc.contributor.authorPersijn, Guido G-
dc.contributor.authorClaas, Frans H J-
dc.date.accessioned2006-05-17T12:26:36Z-
dc.date.available2006-05-17T12:26:36Z-
dc.date.issued2005-10-27-
dc.identifier.citationTransplantation 2005, 80(8):1012-8en
dc.identifier.issn0041-1337-
dc.identifier.pmid16278579-
dc.identifier.otherNEP12en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/2756-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Some studies have claimed that patients with immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy have better graft survival than other renal graft recipients, whereas others have rejected this statement. We have addressed this paradox in the present study. METHODS: In all, 1,207 patients with IgA nephropathy who received a primary cadaveric renal graft from 1990 to 2002 were identified in the Eurotransplant database. For comparison, we analyzed 7,935 patients with nonglomerular diseases. Death-censored graft survival was calculated using Kaplan Meier estimates and a multivariable Cox regression analysis was used for risk calculations. RESULTS: Death-censored graft survival was superior in patients with IgA nephropathy in the first period after transplantation. After 3 years posttransplant, however, there was an accelerated decline in graft survival in recipients with IgA nephropathy. The fully adjusted risk of graft loss in the first year was increased by 40% in the control group compared to IgA nephropathy (hazard ratio [HR] 1.40, 95% CI 1.12-1.75), whereas the risk was significantly lower in the control group after the first year posttransplant (HR 0.75, 95% CI 0.63-0.88). Cold ischemia time, immunization and HLA-DR mismatch were risk factors for graft loss in the control group but not for IgA nephropathy, whereas HLA-AB mismatch was an independent risk factor, exclusively for the IgA nephropathy group. CONCLUSIONS: Recipients with IgA nephropathy have better 1-year graft survival, presumably due to favorable immunological behavior. This benefit was however abolished in the long-term by increased graft loss with time. Studies are needed to explain the difference in graft survival and the reason why different risk factors are involved in graft failure.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins, Incen
dc.relation.urlhttp://gateway.ut.ovid.com/gw2/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=fulltext&D=ovft&AN=00007890-200510270-00003&NEWS=N&CSC=Y&CHANNEL=PubMeden
dc.subjectAdolescenten
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectAged, 80 and overen
dc.subjectComparative Studyen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectGlomerulonephritis, IGAen
dc.subjectGraft Rejectionen
dc.subjectGraft Survivalen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectImmunoglobulin Aen
dc.subjectKidney Transplantationen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden
dc.subjectRegistriesen
dc.subjectRisk Factorsen
dc.subjectTreatment Outcomeen
dc.titleExclusive characteristics of graft survival and risk factors in recipients with immunoglobulin A nephropathy: a retrospective analysis of registry dataen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalTransplantationen
dc.format.digYES-

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