Socioeconomic status is a risk factor for epilepsy in Icelandic adults but not in children.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/2770
Title:
Socioeconomic status is a risk factor for epilepsy in Icelandic adults but not in children.
Authors:
Hesdorffer, Dale C; Tian, Hong; Anand, Kishlay; Hauser, W Allen; Ludvigsson, Petur; Olafsson, Elias; Kjartansson, Olafur
Citation:
Epilepsia 2005, 46(8):1297-303
Issue Date:
1-Aug-2005
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Two earlier population-based studies provide conflicting information on the association between low socioeconomic status (SES) and risk for epilepsy. Seizure etiologies (e.g., head injury, stroke) associated with low SES were not addressed in prior analyses. We assess the relation between SES indices and incident epilepsy separately for children and adults and in subgroups defined by seizure etiology. METHODS: In this population-based case-control study, a surveillance system identified incident unprovoked seizure or first diagnosis of epilepsy throughout Iceland (n = 418). Controls were selected from the population registry as the next two same-sex births alive, residing in Iceland at the time of the index seizure, and without a history of unprovoked seizure on the date of the case's incident seizure (n = 835). The odds ratio measured the association between SES and epilepsy. RESULTS: An association was found between epilepsy and SES among adults, but not among children. Among adults, low education was associated with an increased risk for epilepsy [odds ratio (OR), 2.29; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.21-4.34), and home ownership was protective (OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.43-0.92). When analyses were repeated by seizure etiology, this association remained only in the group with epilepsy of unknown cause, even after adjusting for alcohol consumption. CONCLUSIONS: Low SES, indexed by low education or lack of home ownership, is a risk factor for epilepsy in adults, but not in children, suggesting a cumulative effect of SES on risk for epilepsy. This association is not explained by established risk factors for epilepsy (e.g., head injury, stroke). We find no evidence of a downward social drift among cases whose parents had epilepsy.
Additional Links:
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1528-1167.2005.10705.x

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHesdorffer, Dale C-
dc.contributor.authorTian, Hong-
dc.contributor.authorAnand, Kishlay-
dc.contributor.authorHauser, W Allen-
dc.contributor.authorLudvigsson, Petur-
dc.contributor.authorOlafsson, Elias-
dc.contributor.authorKjartansson, Olafur-
dc.date.accessioned2006-05-17T13:41:36Z-
dc.date.available2006-05-17T13:41:36Z-
dc.date.issued2005-08-01-
dc.identifier.citationEpilepsia 2005, 46(8):1297-303en
dc.identifier.issn0013-9580-
dc.identifier.pmid16060943-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1528-1167.2005.10705.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/2770-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Two earlier population-based studies provide conflicting information on the association between low socioeconomic status (SES) and risk for epilepsy. Seizure etiologies (e.g., head injury, stroke) associated with low SES were not addressed in prior analyses. We assess the relation between SES indices and incident epilepsy separately for children and adults and in subgroups defined by seizure etiology. METHODS: In this population-based case-control study, a surveillance system identified incident unprovoked seizure or first diagnosis of epilepsy throughout Iceland (n = 418). Controls were selected from the population registry as the next two same-sex births alive, residing in Iceland at the time of the index seizure, and without a history of unprovoked seizure on the date of the case's incident seizure (n = 835). The odds ratio measured the association between SES and epilepsy. RESULTS: An association was found between epilepsy and SES among adults, but not among children. Among adults, low education was associated with an increased risk for epilepsy [odds ratio (OR), 2.29; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.21-4.34), and home ownership was protective (OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.43-0.92). When analyses were repeated by seizure etiology, this association remained only in the group with epilepsy of unknown cause, even after adjusting for alcohol consumption. CONCLUSIONS: Low SES, indexed by low education or lack of home ownership, is a risk factor for epilepsy in adults, but not in children, suggesting a cumulative effect of SES on risk for epilepsy. This association is not explained by established risk factors for epilepsy (e.g., head injury, stroke). We find no evidence of a downward social drift among cases whose parents had epilepsy.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBlackwell Scienceen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1528-1167.2005.10705.xen
dc.subjectTaugalæknisfræðien
dc.subjectAdolescenten
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectAge Factorsen
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectCase-Control Studiesen
dc.subjectChilden
dc.subjectChild, Preschoolen
dc.subjectComparative Studyen
dc.subjectEducational Statusen
dc.subjectEpilepsyen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectIceland/epidemiologyen
dc.subjectInfanten
dc.subjectInfant, Newbornen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden
dc.subjectPovertyen
dc.subjectPrevalenceen
dc.subjectRegistriesen
dc.subjectRisk Factorsen
dc.subjectSocial Classen
dc.titleSocioeconomic status is a risk factor for epilepsy in Icelandic adults but not in children.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES-

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