Serum osteoprotegerin and its relationship with bone mineral density and markers of bone turnover

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/2771
Title:
Serum osteoprotegerin and its relationship with bone mineral density and markers of bone turnover
Authors:
Indridason, Olafur S; Franzson, Leifur; Sigurdsson, Gunnar
Citation:
Osteoporos Int 2005, 16(4):417-23
Issue Date:
1-Apr-2005
Abstract:
INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to compare age-related differences in osteoprotegerin (OPG) in relationship with BMD and the serum bone markers osteocalcin (OC), collagen crosslinks (CTX), and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRACP-5b). METHODS: Data were derived from a cross-sectional study on bone health in a random sample of community-dwelling adults aged 30 to 85 years in the Reykjavik area in Iceland. All subjects had whole body, hip, and lumbar spine BMD measured (by DXA), gave blood samples, and answered a thorough questionnaire on medications and medical history. We assessed relationships using the Spearman correlation coefficient, partial correlation, and multivariable linear regression. Men and women were analyzed separately. RESULTS: Of 2,310 subjects invited over 2 years, 1,630 participated. After excluding individuals with diseases and medications affecting bone metabolism, 517 women (age 56.1 +/- 16.9 years) and 491 men (age 58.7 +/- 14.9 years) remained for analysis. OPG increased steadily with age in both genders without a gender difference. In women, BMD at all sites declined steadily after age 50. In men, BMD remained relatively stable until age 70, after which it declined significantly. After controlling for age, BMI, and other confounding variables, OPG showed only a borderline positive relationship with whole body BMD in men (P = 0.10), but the relationship was nonsignificant in women. In multivariable models, OPG was inversely related to TRACP-5b (P = 0.002) and positively with OC (P = 0.007), the OC/TRACP-5b (P = 0.001) and OC/CTX (P = 0.02) ratios in women. Among men, multivariable models showed a positive association between OPG and OC (P = 0.05) and OC/TRACP-5b (P < 0.009). CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that serum OPG levels are associated with a profile of bone turnover markers favoring bone formation, suggesting that OPG may be protective against age-related bone loss. Longitudinal studies are needed to address that issue.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://www.springerlink.com/content/rqa99jpc4najj1ry

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorIndridason, Olafur S-
dc.contributor.authorFranzson, Leifur-
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, Gunnar-
dc.date.accessioned2006-05-17T13:46:27Z-
dc.date.available2006-05-17T13:46:27Z-
dc.date.issued2005-04-01-
dc.identifier.citationOsteoporos Int 2005, 16(4):417-23en
dc.identifier.issn0937-941X-
dc.identifier.pmid15776220-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00198-004-1699-x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/2771-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to compare age-related differences in osteoprotegerin (OPG) in relationship with BMD and the serum bone markers osteocalcin (OC), collagen crosslinks (CTX), and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRACP-5b). METHODS: Data were derived from a cross-sectional study on bone health in a random sample of community-dwelling adults aged 30 to 85 years in the Reykjavik area in Iceland. All subjects had whole body, hip, and lumbar spine BMD measured (by DXA), gave blood samples, and answered a thorough questionnaire on medications and medical history. We assessed relationships using the Spearman correlation coefficient, partial correlation, and multivariable linear regression. Men and women were analyzed separately. RESULTS: Of 2,310 subjects invited over 2 years, 1,630 participated. After excluding individuals with diseases and medications affecting bone metabolism, 517 women (age 56.1 +/- 16.9 years) and 491 men (age 58.7 +/- 14.9 years) remained for analysis. OPG increased steadily with age in both genders without a gender difference. In women, BMD at all sites declined steadily after age 50. In men, BMD remained relatively stable until age 70, after which it declined significantly. After controlling for age, BMI, and other confounding variables, OPG showed only a borderline positive relationship with whole body BMD in men (P = 0.10), but the relationship was nonsignificant in women. In multivariable models, OPG was inversely related to TRACP-5b (P = 0.002) and positively with OC (P = 0.007), the OC/TRACP-5b (P = 0.001) and OC/CTX (P = 0.02) ratios in women. Among men, multivariable models showed a positive association between OPG and OC (P = 0.05) and OC/TRACP-5b (P < 0.009). CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that serum OPG levels are associated with a profile of bone turnover markers favoring bone formation, suggesting that OPG may be protective against age-related bone loss. Longitudinal studies are needed to address that issue.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer Internationalen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.springerlink.com/content/rqa99jpc4najj1ryen
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectAged, 80 and overen
dc.subjectAgingen
dc.subjectBiological Markersen
dc.subjectBone Densityen
dc.subjectBone Remodelingen
dc.subjectCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectGlycoproteinsen
dc.subjectHip Jointen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectLumbar Vertebraeen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden
dc.subjectReceptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclearen
dc.subjectReceptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclearen
dc.subjectReceptors, Tumor Necrosis Factoren
dc.subjectSex Characteristicsen
dc.titleSerum osteoprotegerin and its relationship with bone mineral density and markers of bone turnoveren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalOsteoporosis internationalen
dc.format.digYES-

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