Complementary and alternative medicine use in colorectal cancer patients in seven European countries.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/2781
Title:
Complementary and alternative medicine use in colorectal cancer patients in seven European countries.
Authors:
Molassiotis, Alexander; Fernandez-Ortega, Paz; Pud, Dorit; Ozden, Gulten; Platin, Nurgun; Hummerston, Sandra; Scott, Julia A; Panteli, Vassiliki; Gudmundsdottir, Gudbjorg; Selvekerova, Sarka; Patiraki, Elisabeth; Kearney, Nora
Citation:
Complement Ther Med 2005, 13(4):251-7
Issue Date:
1-Dec-2005
Abstract:
PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to examine the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in a sample of colorectal cancer patients in Europe. METHODS: The study was a descriptive cross-sectional survey and data were collected through a 27-item self-reported questionnaire from seven European countries. RESULTS: As part of a larger study, 126 colorectal cancer patients participated in this survey. Among the participants, 32% used CAM after the diagnosis of cancer. Almost half the CAM therapies used were new therapies, never tried before the diagnosis. The most common CAM therapies used included herbal medicine (48.7%), homeopathy (20.5%), use of vitamins/minerals (17.9%), spiritual therapies (15.4%), medicinal teas (15.4%) and relaxation techniques (12.8%). A dramatic increase was observed in the use of CAM from usage levels before the cancer diagnosis. High levels of satisfaction with CAM were also reported. Patients used CAM more often to increase the body's ability to fight the cancer or to improve physical well-being. However, expectations did not always match with the benefits reported. CONCLUSIONS: As one-third of colorectal cancer patients use CAM, health professionals should be more aware of this approach to the patient's management. They should discuss the role of CAM therapies with their patients in a non-judgemental and open manner, and endeavour to provide accurate information in order to allow patients to make their own decision about CAM.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Link
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6WCS-4H4T31C-1/2/10eb943d44fd9ac5a72248683ba8666f

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMolassiotis, Alexander-
dc.contributor.authorFernandez-Ortega, Paz-
dc.contributor.authorPud, Dorit-
dc.contributor.authorOzden, Gulten-
dc.contributor.authorPlatin, Nurgun-
dc.contributor.authorHummerston, Sandra-
dc.contributor.authorScott, Julia A-
dc.contributor.authorPanteli, Vassiliki-
dc.contributor.authorGudmundsdottir, Gudbjorg-
dc.contributor.authorSelvekerova, Sarka-
dc.contributor.authorPatiraki, Elisabeth-
dc.contributor.authorKearney, Nora-
dc.date.accessioned2006-05-17T14:30:55Z-
dc.date.available2006-05-17T14:30:55Z-
dc.date.issued2005-12-01-
dc.identifier.citationComplement Ther Med 2005, 13(4):251-7en
dc.identifier.issn0965-2299-
dc.identifier.pmid16338195-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ctim.2005.07.002-
dc.identifier.otherMAO12en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/2781-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Linken
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to examine the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in a sample of colorectal cancer patients in Europe. METHODS: The study was a descriptive cross-sectional survey and data were collected through a 27-item self-reported questionnaire from seven European countries. RESULTS: As part of a larger study, 126 colorectal cancer patients participated in this survey. Among the participants, 32% used CAM after the diagnosis of cancer. Almost half the CAM therapies used were new therapies, never tried before the diagnosis. The most common CAM therapies used included herbal medicine (48.7%), homeopathy (20.5%), use of vitamins/minerals (17.9%), spiritual therapies (15.4%), medicinal teas (15.4%) and relaxation techniques (12.8%). A dramatic increase was observed in the use of CAM from usage levels before the cancer diagnosis. High levels of satisfaction with CAM were also reported. Patients used CAM more often to increase the body's ability to fight the cancer or to improve physical well-being. However, expectations did not always match with the benefits reported. CONCLUSIONS: As one-third of colorectal cancer patients use CAM, health professionals should be more aware of this approach to the patient's management. They should discuss the role of CAM therapies with their patients in a non-judgemental and open manner, and endeavour to provide accurate information in order to allow patients to make their own decision about CAM.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherChurchill Livingstone,en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6WCS-4H4T31C-1/2/10eb943d44fd9ac5a72248683ba8666fen
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectAged, 80 and overen
dc.subjectColorectal Neoplasms/*therapyen
dc.subjectComplementary Therapies/methods/*utilizationen
dc.subjectCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subjectEuropeen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden
dc.subjectQuestionnairesen
dc.subjectSocioeconomic Factorsen
dc.titleComplementary and alternative medicine use in colorectal cancer patients in seven European countries.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES-

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