Incidence of unprovoked seizures and epilepsy in Iceland and assessment of the epilepsy syndrome classification: a prospective study.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/2784
Title:
Incidence of unprovoked seizures and epilepsy in Iceland and assessment of the epilepsy syndrome classification: a prospective study.
Authors:
Olafsson, Elias; Ludvigsson, Petur; Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Hesdorffer, Dale; Kjartansson, Olafur; Hauser, W Allen
Citation:
Lancet Neurol 2005, 4(10):627-34
Issue Date:
1-Oct-2005
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: No population-based incidence studies of epilepsy have studied syndrome classification from the outset. We prospectively studied the incidence of a single unprovoked seizure and epilepsy in the population of Iceland, and applied the syndrome classification endorsed by the International League Against Epilepsy to this population. METHODS: We used a nationwide surveillance system to prospectively identify all residents of Iceland who presented with a first diagnosis of a single unprovoked seizure or epilepsy between December 1995 and February 1999. All cases were classified by seizure type, cause or risk factors, and epilepsy syndrome. RESULTS: The mean annual incidence of first unprovoked seizures was 56.8 per 100,000 person-years, 23.5 per 100,000 person-years for single unprovoked seizures, and 33.3 per 100,000 person-years for epilepsy (recurrent unprovoked seizures). Incidence was similar in males and females. Partial seizures occurred in 40% and a putative cause was identified in 33%. Age-specific incidence was highest in the first year of life (130 per 100,000 person-years) and in those 65 years and older (110.5 per 100,000 person-years). Using strict diagnostic criteria for epilepsy syndromes, 58% of cases fell into non-informative categories. Idiopathic epilepsy syndromes were identified in 14% of all cases. INTERPRETATION: Findings are consistent with incidence studies from developed countries. Although the epilepsy syndrome classification might be useful in tertiary epilepsy centers, it has limited practicality in population studies and for use by general neurologists.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Link
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6X3F-4H27C5G-1/2/f9b2b7ec2da8830e855132683ecfb31a

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOlafsson, Elias-
dc.contributor.authorLudvigsson, Petur-
dc.contributor.authorGudmundsson, Gunnar-
dc.contributor.authorHesdorffer, Dale-
dc.contributor.authorKjartansson, Olafur-
dc.contributor.authorHauser, W Allen-
dc.date.accessioned2006-05-17T14:44:09Z-
dc.date.available2006-05-17T14:44:09Z-
dc.date.issued2005-10-01-
dc.identifier.citationLancet Neurol 2005, 4(10):627-34en
dc.identifier.issn1474-4422-
dc.identifier.pmid16168931-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1474-4422(05)70172-1-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/2784-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Linken
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: No population-based incidence studies of epilepsy have studied syndrome classification from the outset. We prospectively studied the incidence of a single unprovoked seizure and epilepsy in the population of Iceland, and applied the syndrome classification endorsed by the International League Against Epilepsy to this population. METHODS: We used a nationwide surveillance system to prospectively identify all residents of Iceland who presented with a first diagnosis of a single unprovoked seizure or epilepsy between December 1995 and February 1999. All cases were classified by seizure type, cause or risk factors, and epilepsy syndrome. RESULTS: The mean annual incidence of first unprovoked seizures was 56.8 per 100,000 person-years, 23.5 per 100,000 person-years for single unprovoked seizures, and 33.3 per 100,000 person-years for epilepsy (recurrent unprovoked seizures). Incidence was similar in males and females. Partial seizures occurred in 40% and a putative cause was identified in 33%. Age-specific incidence was highest in the first year of life (130 per 100,000 person-years) and in those 65 years and older (110.5 per 100,000 person-years). Using strict diagnostic criteria for epilepsy syndromes, 58% of cases fell into non-informative categories. Idiopathic epilepsy syndromes were identified in 14% of all cases. INTERPRETATION: Findings are consistent with incidence studies from developed countries. Although the epilepsy syndrome classification might be useful in tertiary epilepsy centers, it has limited practicality in population studies and for use by general neurologists.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLancet Pub. Groupen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6X3F-4H27C5G-1/2/f9b2b7ec2da8830e855132683ecfb31aen
dc.subjectAdolescenten
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectAge Distributionen
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectChilden
dc.subjectChild, Preschoolen
dc.subjectCohort Studiesen
dc.subjectEpilepsy/*classification/diagnosis/*epidemiologyen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectIceland/epidemiologyen
dc.subjectIncidenceen
dc.subjectInfanten
dc.subjectInfant, Newbornen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden
dc.subjectProspective Studiesen
dc.subjectRisk Factorsen
dc.subjectSex Distributionen
dc.titleIncidence of unprovoked seizures and epilepsy in Iceland and assessment of the epilepsy syndrome classification: a prospective study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Hirsla are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.