Differential expression of chemokine receptors on peripheral blood B cells from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/2807
Title:
Differential expression of chemokine receptors on peripheral blood B cells from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus
Authors:
Henneken, Maren; Dörner, Thomas; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Berek, Claudia
Citation:
Arthritis Res. Ther. 2005, 7(5):R1001-13
Issue Date:
2005
Abstract:
Chemokines and their receptors are essential in the recruitment and positioning of lymphocytes. To address the question of B cell migration into the inflamed synovial tissue of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), peripheral blood naive B cells, memory B cells and plasma cells were analyzed for cell surface expression of the chemokine receptors CXCR3, CXCR4, CXCR5, CCR5, CCR6, CCR7 and CCR9. For comparison, B cells in the peripheral blood of patients with the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or with the degenerative disease osteoarthritis (OA) were analyzed. Expression levels of chemokine receptors were measured by flow cytometry and were compared between the different patient groups and healthy individuals. The analysis of chemokine receptor expression showed that the majority of peripheral blood B cells is positive for CXCR3, CXCR4, CXCR5, CCR6 and CCR7. Whereas a small fraction of B cells were positive for CCR5, practically no expression of CCR9 was found. In comparison with healthy individuals, in patients with RA a significant fraction of B cells showed a decreased expression of CXCR5 and CCR6 and increased levels of CXCR3. The downregulation of CXCR5 correlated with an upregulation of CXCR3. In patients with SLE, significant changes in CXCR5 expression were seen. The functionality of the chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CXCR4 was demonstrated by transmigration assays with the chemokines CXCL10 and CXCL12, respectively. Our results suggest that chronic inflammation leads to modulation of chemokine receptor expression on peripheral blood B cells. However, differences between patients with RA and patients with SLE point toward a disease-specific regulation of receptor expression. These differences may influence the migrational behavior of B cells.
Description:
To access full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink "Full Text" at the bottom of this page
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/ar1776

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHenneken, Maren-
dc.contributor.authorDörner, Thomas-
dc.contributor.authorBurmester, Gerd-Rüdiger-
dc.contributor.authorBerek, Claudia-
dc.date.accessioned2006-05-17T15:53:38Z-
dc.date.available2006-05-17T15:53:38Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationArthritis Res. Ther. 2005, 7(5):R1001-13en
dc.identifier.issn1478-6362-
dc.identifier.pmid16207316-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/ar1776-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/2807-
dc.descriptionTo access full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink "Full Text" at the bottom of this pageen
dc.description.abstractChemokines and their receptors are essential in the recruitment and positioning of lymphocytes. To address the question of B cell migration into the inflamed synovial tissue of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), peripheral blood naive B cells, memory B cells and plasma cells were analyzed for cell surface expression of the chemokine receptors CXCR3, CXCR4, CXCR5, CCR5, CCR6, CCR7 and CCR9. For comparison, B cells in the peripheral blood of patients with the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or with the degenerative disease osteoarthritis (OA) were analyzed. Expression levels of chemokine receptors were measured by flow cytometry and were compared between the different patient groups and healthy individuals. The analysis of chemokine receptor expression showed that the majority of peripheral blood B cells is positive for CXCR3, CXCR4, CXCR5, CCR6 and CCR7. Whereas a small fraction of B cells were positive for CCR5, practically no expression of CCR9 was found. In comparison with healthy individuals, in patients with RA a significant fraction of B cells showed a decreased expression of CXCR5 and CCR6 and increased levels of CXCR3. The downregulation of CXCR5 correlated with an upregulation of CXCR3. In patients with SLE, significant changes in CXCR5 expression were seen. The functionality of the chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CXCR4 was demonstrated by transmigration assays with the chemokines CXCL10 and CXCL12, respectively. Our results suggest that chronic inflammation leads to modulation of chemokine receptor expression on peripheral blood B cells. However, differences between patients with RA and patients with SLE point toward a disease-specific regulation of receptor expression. These differences may influence the migrational behavior of B cells.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/ar1776en
dc.subjectAntirheumatic Agentsen
dc.subjectArthritis, Rheumatoiden
dc.subjectArthritis, Rheumatoiden
dc.subjectAutoimmune Diseasesen
dc.subjectAutoimmune Diseasesen
dc.subjectAutoimmune Diseasesen
dc.subjectB-Lymphocytesen
dc.subjectChemokinesen
dc.subjectChemokines, CXC/blooden
dc.subjectChemotaxis, Leukocyteen
dc.subjectComparative Studyen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectLupus Erythematosus, Systemicen
dc.subjectOsteoarthritisen
dc.subjectReceptors, CXCR4en
dc.subjectReceptors, Chemokineen
dc.subjectReceptors, Chemokineen
dc.subjectReceptors, Cytokineen
dc.titleDifferential expression of chemokine receptors on peripheral blood B cells from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosusen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalArthritis research & therapyem
dc.format.digYES-

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