2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/2830
Title:
Applicability of the Nursing Interventions Classification to describe nursing
Authors:
Thoroddsen, Asta
Citation:
Scand J Caring Sci 2005, 19(2):128-39
Issue Date:
1-Jun-2005
Abstract:
The aim of this survey was to test the applicability of the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) system for use in a future nursing information system for documenting nursing in an electronic patient record in Iceland. Also, the aim was to test the translation of NIC into Icelandic. In order to be applicable to nursing NIC needs to be sensitive enough to describe the work nurses do, differentiate between specialities in nursing, and be understandable to nurses. A sample of 198 nurses was asked to identify how often they used each of 433 NIC nursing interventions. Of the 36 most frequently used interventions half are within the physiological domain. Core nursing interventions were different between specialities, e.g. Analgesic Administration had a high mean score in surgical nursing, and Health Education in primary health care. anova for the 27 classes in NIC showed significant differences (p < 0.01) by all nursing specialities except one, Crisis Management. A Tukey post hoc test showed how nursing specialities were reflected differently in the NIC domains, e.g. medical/surgical nursing in the Physiological: Basic Domain, but psychiatric nursing in the Behavioural Domain. Factor analysis of classes in NIC show good resemblance with the domains in NIC and the structure of the classification is strongly supported, except the Safety Domain. The results from this study indicate that nurses in the sample consider NIC to be applicable to describe nursing. The language is a powerful tool and is central in reflecting nursing practice as well as supporting the construct of knowledge. The translation of NIC to Icelandic is one step in many in preparing nurses to use a standardized language which can also be used in an electronic patient record.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1471-6712.2005.00332.x

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThoroddsen, Asta-
dc.date.accessioned2006-05-18T11:48:53Z-
dc.date.available2006-05-18T11:48:53Z-
dc.date.issued2005-06-01-
dc.identifier.citationScand J Caring Sci 2005, 19(2):128-39en
dc.identifier.issn0283-9318-
dc.identifier.pmid15877638-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1471-6712.2005.00332.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/2830-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this survey was to test the applicability of the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) system for use in a future nursing information system for documenting nursing in an electronic patient record in Iceland. Also, the aim was to test the translation of NIC into Icelandic. In order to be applicable to nursing NIC needs to be sensitive enough to describe the work nurses do, differentiate between specialities in nursing, and be understandable to nurses. A sample of 198 nurses was asked to identify how often they used each of 433 NIC nursing interventions. Of the 36 most frequently used interventions half are within the physiological domain. Core nursing interventions were different between specialities, e.g. Analgesic Administration had a high mean score in surgical nursing, and Health Education in primary health care. anova for the 27 classes in NIC showed significant differences (p < 0.01) by all nursing specialities except one, Crisis Management. A Tukey post hoc test showed how nursing specialities were reflected differently in the NIC domains, e.g. medical/surgical nursing in the Physiological: Basic Domain, but psychiatric nursing in the Behavioural Domain. Factor analysis of classes in NIC show good resemblance with the domains in NIC and the structure of the classification is strongly supported, except the Safety Domain. The results from this study indicate that nurses in the sample consider NIC to be applicable to describe nursing. The language is a powerful tool and is central in reflecting nursing practice as well as supporting the construct of knowledge. The translation of NIC to Icelandic is one step in many in preparing nurses to use a standardized language which can also be used in an electronic patient record.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBlackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1471-6712.2005.00332.xen
dc.subjectVocabulary, Controlleden
dc.subjectMedical Records Systems, Computerizeden
dc.subjectNursing Recordsen
dc.subjectNursing Processen
dc.subjectAttitude of Health Personnelen
dc.subjectNursing Staffen
dc.subjectNurse's Roleen
dc.subjectNursing Evaluation Researchen
dc.subjectNursing Informaticsen
dc.subjectNursing Methodology Researchen
dc.subjectHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen
dc.subjectHealth Services Needs and Demanden
dc.subjectTerminologyen
dc.subjectSemanticsen
dc.subjectAnalysis of Varianceen
dc.subjectFactor Analysis, Statisticalen
dc.subjectSensitivity and Specificityen
dc.subjectQuestionnairesen
dc.subjectTranslatingen
dc.subjectResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'ten
dc.subjectIcelanden
dc.titleApplicability of the Nursing Interventions Classification to describe nursingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalScandinavian journal of caring sciencesen
dc.format.digYES-
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