Childhood idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in the Nordic countries: epidemiology and predictors of chronic disease

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/2850
Title:
Childhood idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in the Nordic countries: epidemiology and predictors of chronic disease
Authors:
Zeller, Bernward; Rajantie, Jukka; Hedlund-Treutiger, Iris; Tedgård, Ulf; Wesenberg, Finn; Jonsson, Olafur G; Henter, Jan Inge
Citation:
Acta Paediatr. 2005, 94(2):178-84
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2005
Abstract:
AIM: To describe the epidemiology of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in the Nordic countries, to define clinical subgroups and to investigate factors predicting chronic disease. METHODS: A prospective registration was done from 1998 to 2000, including all children with newly diagnosed ITP aged 0-14 y and at least one platelet count <30 x 10(9)/l. RESULTS: 506 children were registered and 423 followed for 6 mo. The incidence was 4.8/10(5) per year. Most children were aged 0-7 y (78%), with a predominance of boys, while patients aged 8-14 y had equal representation of the two sexes. There were seasonal variations determined by variations in postinfectious cases with sudden onset. The platelet count was <10 x 10(9)/l in 58%, but bleeding manifestations were mild or moderate in 97%. The insidious form (symptoms for more than 2 wk) was more frequent in older children and girls, showed little seasonal variation, had milder manifestations and ran a chronic course in more than half the cases. Intracranial haemorrhages did not occur in the first 6 mo after diagnosis. Chronic ITP developed in 25%. The strongest predictor of chronic disease was insidious onset of symptoms (OR 5.97). CONCLUSION: In the Nordic countries, ITP mainly affects children aged 0-7 y, with a winter bulk of postinfectious cases superimposed on a steady occurrence of non-infectious cases. Clinically, it may be useful to distinguish between children with sudden versus insidious onset of symptoms rather than between different age groups.
Additional Links:
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1651-2227.2005.tb01887.x

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZeller, Bernward-
dc.contributor.authorRajantie, Jukka-
dc.contributor.authorHedlund-Treutiger, Iris-
dc.contributor.authorTedgård, Ulf-
dc.contributor.authorWesenberg, Finn-
dc.contributor.authorJonsson, Olafur G-
dc.contributor.authorHenter, Jan Inge-
dc.date.accessioned2006-05-18T14:42:37Z-
dc.date.available2006-05-18T14:42:37Z-
dc.date.issued2005-02-01-
dc.identifier.citationActa Paediatr. 2005, 94(2):178-84en
dc.identifier.issn0803-5253-
dc.identifier.pmid15981751-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/2850-
dc.description.abstractAIM: To describe the epidemiology of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in the Nordic countries, to define clinical subgroups and to investigate factors predicting chronic disease. METHODS: A prospective registration was done from 1998 to 2000, including all children with newly diagnosed ITP aged 0-14 y and at least one platelet count <30 x 10(9)/l. RESULTS: 506 children were registered and 423 followed for 6 mo. The incidence was 4.8/10(5) per year. Most children were aged 0-7 y (78%), with a predominance of boys, while patients aged 8-14 y had equal representation of the two sexes. There were seasonal variations determined by variations in postinfectious cases with sudden onset. The platelet count was <10 x 10(9)/l in 58%, but bleeding manifestations were mild or moderate in 97%. The insidious form (symptoms for more than 2 wk) was more frequent in older children and girls, showed little seasonal variation, had milder manifestations and ran a chronic course in more than half the cases. Intracranial haemorrhages did not occur in the first 6 mo after diagnosis. Chronic ITP developed in 25%. The strongest predictor of chronic disease was insidious onset of symptoms (OR 5.97). CONCLUSION: In the Nordic countries, ITP mainly affects children aged 0-7 y, with a winter bulk of postinfectious cases superimposed on a steady occurrence of non-infectious cases. Clinically, it may be useful to distinguish between children with sudden versus insidious onset of symptoms rather than between different age groups.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1651-2227.2005.tb01887.xen
dc.subjectAcute Diseaseen
dc.subjectAdolescenten
dc.subjectChilden
dc.subjectChronic Diseaseen
dc.subjectFinland/epidemiologyen
dc.subjectHemorrhageen
dc.subjectIceland/epidemiologyen
dc.subjectIncidenceen
dc.subjectInfanten
dc.subjectPrognosisen
dc.subjectProspective Studiesen
dc.subjectPurpura, Thrombocytopenic,en
dc.subjectRisk Factorsen
dc.subjectScandinavia/epidemiologyen
dc.subjectStatistics, Nonparametricen
dc.titleChildhood idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in the Nordic countries: epidemiology and predictors of chronic diseaseen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalActa paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992)en
dc.format.digYES-

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