Narrowband-UVB irradiation decreases the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by stimulated T cells

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/2851
Title:
Narrowband-UVB irradiation decreases the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by stimulated T cells
Authors:
Sigmundsdottir, Hekla; Johnston, Andrew; Gudjonsson, Johann Eli; Valdimarsson, Helgi
Citation:
Arch. Dermatol. Res. 2005, 297(1):39-42
Issue Date:
2005
Abstract:
Narrow-band ultraviolet B (UVB) phototherapy is an effective treatment for psoriasis. Owing to its limited penetration, the direct effects of UVB are mostly restricted to cells residing in the epidermis and papillary dermis, and are associated with epidermal depletion of Langerhans' cells (LC) and T cells. It has been argued that the depletion of the skin-resident T-cell population may be due to a combination of UVB-induced apoptosis and decreased recruitment from the blood due to lower expression of the required adhesion and homing molecules. We have previously demonstrated that UVB treatment can alter the expression of adhesion molecules by blood lymphocytes, and as these can be influenced by cytokines, the aim of this study was to investigate whether UVB irradiation can also influence the cytokine production of circulating T cells. Four patients with active chronic plaque psoriasis were treated daily with narrow-band 312 nm UVB irradiation and blood samples obtained before treatment and weekly thereafter for 2 weeks. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated and cultured with a streptococcal superantigen or a conventional streptococcal antigen preparation, and cell culture supernatants were assayed for various cytokines. When stimulated with the superantigen, PBMCs from UVB-treated psoriasis patients secreted greater amounts of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, and showed markedly decreased production of IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-5 and IL-6 compared to the pre-treatment values; the production of IFN-gamma, IL-8 and IL-12p70 were also decreased but did not reach statistical significance. Thus, the combination of UVB-induced apoptosis, increased secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokines and decreased trafficking to the skin may help to explain the beneficial effects of UVB treatment on psoriasis and why disease remission can sometimes be sustained for a prolonged period.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Link field
Additional Links:
http://www.springerlink.com/content/x05l537554pl8801

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSigmundsdottir, Hekla-
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Andrew-
dc.contributor.authorGudjonsson, Johann Eli-
dc.contributor.authorValdimarsson, Helgi-
dc.date.accessioned2006-05-18T15:08:34Z-
dc.date.available2006-05-18T15:08:34Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationArch. Dermatol. Res. 2005, 297(1):39-42en
dc.identifier.issn0340-3696-
dc.identifier.pmid15889264-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00403-005-0565-9-
dc.identifier.otherAAI12en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/2851-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Link fielden
dc.description.abstractNarrow-band ultraviolet B (UVB) phototherapy is an effective treatment for psoriasis. Owing to its limited penetration, the direct effects of UVB are mostly restricted to cells residing in the epidermis and papillary dermis, and are associated with epidermal depletion of Langerhans' cells (LC) and T cells. It has been argued that the depletion of the skin-resident T-cell population may be due to a combination of UVB-induced apoptosis and decreased recruitment from the blood due to lower expression of the required adhesion and homing molecules. We have previously demonstrated that UVB treatment can alter the expression of adhesion molecules by blood lymphocytes, and as these can be influenced by cytokines, the aim of this study was to investigate whether UVB irradiation can also influence the cytokine production of circulating T cells. Four patients with active chronic plaque psoriasis were treated daily with narrow-band 312 nm UVB irradiation and blood samples obtained before treatment and weekly thereafter for 2 weeks. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated and cultured with a streptococcal superantigen or a conventional streptococcal antigen preparation, and cell culture supernatants were assayed for various cytokines. When stimulated with the superantigen, PBMCs from UVB-treated psoriasis patients secreted greater amounts of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, and showed markedly decreased production of IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-5 and IL-6 compared to the pre-treatment values; the production of IFN-gamma, IL-8 and IL-12p70 were also decreased but did not reach statistical significance. Thus, the combination of UVB-induced apoptosis, increased secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokines and decreased trafficking to the skin may help to explain the beneficial effects of UVB treatment on psoriasis and why disease remission can sometimes be sustained for a prolonged period.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.springerlink.com/content/x05l537554pl8801en
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectApoptosisen
dc.subjectCytokinesen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectLymphocyte Activationen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden
dc.subjectPsoriasisen
dc.subjectPsoriasisen
dc.subjectT-Lymphocytesen
dc.titleNarrowband-UVB irradiation decreases the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by stimulated T cellsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES-
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