Childhood levels of immunoglobulins and mannan-binding lectin in relation to infections and allergy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/2852
Title:
Childhood levels of immunoglobulins and mannan-binding lectin in relation to infections and allergy
Authors:
Thorarinsdottir, H K; Ludviksson, B R; Vikingsdottir, T; Leopoldsdottir, M O; Ardal, B; Jonsson, T; Valdimarsson, H; Arason, G J
Citation:
Scand. J. Immunol. 2005, 61(5):466-74
Issue Date:
2005
Abstract:
Respiratory tract infections, allergies and otitis media are common problems in early childhood. Our aim was to evaluate in a longitudinal community-based cohort study the association between maturation of immunoglobulin (Ig) and mannan-binding lectin (MBL) responses and disease manifestations in the first 4 years of life. Sustained low levels of IgA proved the strongest single indicator of susceptibility for recurrent otitis media (P = 0.008) and respiratory tract infections (P = 0.02), and this condition was also associated with low production of IgG subclasses. About 7% of the cohort had sustained low levels of MBL (<0.4 mg/l). Low MBL did not predispose to any ailments studied, but children with low IgA and recurrent otitis media had relatively low MBL at birth, which failed to increase during the study period and was significantly reduced at the age of 4 years (P = 0.04). MBL levels increased from birth to 2 years (P < 0.0001) and were higher in children than in adults (P = 0.001). The increase was 1.9-fold in children with no recorded clinical events and 1.7-fold in children with asthma or infections, but significantly lower, 1.2-fold, in children with recurrent otitis media. Low levels of IgA within the normal range may reveal disease susceptibility not detected by conventional criteria. Slow maturation of Ig appears to be the main factor of susceptibility during childhood, but a strong corollary role for MBL is indicated by the high levels produced during childhood as well as the precipitation of disease in children with low levels of MBL and Ig.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Link field
Additional Links:
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1365-3083.2005.01588.x

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThorarinsdottir, H K-
dc.contributor.authorLudviksson, B R-
dc.contributor.authorVikingsdottir, T-
dc.contributor.authorLeopoldsdottir, M O-
dc.contributor.authorArdal, B-
dc.contributor.authorJonsson, T-
dc.contributor.authorValdimarsson, H-
dc.contributor.authorArason, G J-
dc.date.accessioned2006-05-18T15:21:44Z-
dc.date.available2006-05-18T15:21:44Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationScand. J. Immunol. 2005, 61(5):466-74en
dc.identifier.issn0300-9475-
dc.identifier.pmid15882439-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-3083.2005.01588.x-
dc.identifier.otherAAI12en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/2852-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Link fielden
dc.description.abstractRespiratory tract infections, allergies and otitis media are common problems in early childhood. Our aim was to evaluate in a longitudinal community-based cohort study the association between maturation of immunoglobulin (Ig) and mannan-binding lectin (MBL) responses and disease manifestations in the first 4 years of life. Sustained low levels of IgA proved the strongest single indicator of susceptibility for recurrent otitis media (P = 0.008) and respiratory tract infections (P = 0.02), and this condition was also associated with low production of IgG subclasses. About 7% of the cohort had sustained low levels of MBL (<0.4 mg/l). Low MBL did not predispose to any ailments studied, but children with low IgA and recurrent otitis media had relatively low MBL at birth, which failed to increase during the study period and was significantly reduced at the age of 4 years (P = 0.04). MBL levels increased from birth to 2 years (P < 0.0001) and were higher in children than in adults (P = 0.001). The increase was 1.9-fold in children with no recorded clinical events and 1.7-fold in children with asthma or infections, but significantly lower, 1.2-fold, in children with recurrent otitis media. Low levels of IgA within the normal range may reveal disease susceptibility not detected by conventional criteria. Slow maturation of Ig appears to be the main factor of susceptibility during childhood, but a strong corollary role for MBL is indicated by the high levels produced during childhood as well as the precipitation of disease in children with low levels of MBL and Ig.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBlackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1365-3083.2005.01588.xen
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectCohort Studiesen
dc.subjectComparative Studyen
dc.subjectDisease Susceptibilityen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectHypersensitivityen
dc.subjectHypersensitivity/pathologyen
dc.subjectImmunoglobulin Aen
dc.subjectImmunoglobulin Gen
dc.subjectInfanten
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMannose-Binding Lectinen
dc.subjectOtitis Mediaen
dc.subjectOtitis Mediaen
dc.subjectRespiratory Tract Infectionsen
dc.titleChildhood levels of immunoglobulins and mannan-binding lectin in relation to infections and allergyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES-

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