2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/295221
Title:
Insomnia in untreated sleep apnea patients compared to controls.
Authors:
Björnsdóttir, Erla; Janson, Christer; Gíslason, Thorarinn; Sigurdsson, Jón F; Pack, Allan I; Gehrman, Philip; Benediktsdóttir, Bryndís
Citation:
J Sleep Res 2012, 21(2):131-8
Issue Date:
Apr-2012
Abstract:
Insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) often coexist, but the nature of their relationship is unclear. The aims of this study were to compare the prevalence of initial and middle insomnia between OSA patients and controls from the general population as well as to study the influence of insomnia on sleepiness and quality of life in OSA patients. Two groups were compared, untreated OSA patients (n = 824) and controls ≥ 40 years from the general population in Iceland (n = 762). All subjects answered the same questionnaires on health and sleep and OSA patients underwent a sleep study. Altogether, 53% of controls were males compared to 81% of OSA patients. Difficulties maintaining sleep (DMS) were more common among men and women with OSA compared to the general population (52 versus 31% and 62 versus 31%, respectively, P < 0.0001). Difficulties initiating sleep (DIS) and DIS + DMS were more common among women with OSA compared to women without OSA. OSA patients with DMS were sleepier than patients without DMS (Epworth Sleepiness Scale: 12.2 versus 10.9, P < 0.001), while both DMS and DIS were related to lower quality of life in OSA patients as measured by the Short Form 12 (physical score 39 versus 42 and mental score 36 versus 41, P < 0.001). DIS and DMS were not related to OSA severity. Insomnia is common among OSA patients and has a negative influence on quality of life and sleepiness in this patient group. It is relevant to screen for insomnia among OSA patients and treat both conditions when they co-occur.
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2869.2011.00972.x; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3258454/
Rights:
Archived with thanks to Journal of sleep research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBjörnsdóttir, Erlaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJanson, Christeren_GB
dc.contributor.authorGíslason, Thorarinnen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, Jón Fen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPack, Allan Ien_GB
dc.contributor.authorGehrman, Philipen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBenediktsdóttir, Bryndísen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-04T12:19:57Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-04T12:19:57Z-
dc.date.issued2012-04-
dc.date.submitted2013-07-04-
dc.identifier.citationJ Sleep Res 2012, 21(2):131-8en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1365-2869-
dc.identifier.pmid21988168-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2869.2011.00972.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/295221-
dc.description.abstractInsomnia and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) often coexist, but the nature of their relationship is unclear. The aims of this study were to compare the prevalence of initial and middle insomnia between OSA patients and controls from the general population as well as to study the influence of insomnia on sleepiness and quality of life in OSA patients. Two groups were compared, untreated OSA patients (n = 824) and controls ≥ 40 years from the general population in Iceland (n = 762). All subjects answered the same questionnaires on health and sleep and OSA patients underwent a sleep study. Altogether, 53% of controls were males compared to 81% of OSA patients. Difficulties maintaining sleep (DMS) were more common among men and women with OSA compared to the general population (52 versus 31% and 62 versus 31%, respectively, P < 0.0001). Difficulties initiating sleep (DIS) and DIS + DMS were more common among women with OSA compared to women without OSA. OSA patients with DMS were sleepier than patients without DMS (Epworth Sleepiness Scale: 12.2 versus 10.9, P < 0.001), while both DMS and DIS were related to lower quality of life in OSA patients as measured by the Short Form 12 (physical score 39 versus 42 and mental score 36 versus 41, P < 0.001). DIS and DMS were not related to OSA severity. Insomnia is common among OSA patients and has a negative influence on quality of life and sleepiness in this patient group. It is relevant to screen for insomnia among OSA patients and treat both conditions when they co-occur.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipNIH HL072067, HL094307en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2869.2011.00972.xen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3258454/en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of sleep researchen_GB
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIcelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_GB
dc.subject.meshQuality of Lifeen_GB
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_GB
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshSleep Apnea, Obstructiveen_GB
dc.subject.meshSleep Initiation and Maintenance Disordersen_GB
dc.subject.meshSnoringen_GB
dc.titleInsomnia in untreated sleep apnea patients compared to controls.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentFaculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of sleep researchen_GB
dc.rights.accessOpen Access - Opinn aðganguren
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