Personality and risk for depression in a birth cohort of 70-year-olds followed for 15 years

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/29581
Title:
Personality and risk for depression in a birth cohort of 70-year-olds followed for 15 years
Authors:
Duberstein, P R; Palsson, S P; Waern, M; Skoog, I
Citation:
Personality and risk for depression in a birth cohort of 70-year-olds followed for 15 years. 2008, 38 (5):663-71notPsychol Med
Issue Date:
1-May-2008
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: The association between personality traits and the first lifetime onset of clinically significant depression has not been studied in older adults. METHOD: Experienced psychiatrists conducted interviews and chart reviews at baseline and throughout the 15-year follow-up period. Survival analyses were conducted on the presence/absence of a DSM-III-R mood disorder at follow-up. RESULTS: There were 59 cases of first lifetime episodes of depression. Analyses showed that Neuroticism [hazard ratio (HR) per one point increase in the Maudsley Personality Inventory (MPI)=1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.08] but not Extroversion (HR 1.02, 95% CI 0.97-1.06) amplified risk for mood disorder. CONCLUSIONS: This prospective study on a randomly sampled birth cohort of older adults showed that Neuroticism confers risk for a first lifetime episode of clinically significant depression. Findings have implications for understanding the etiology of late-life depression (LLD) and could also aid in the identification and treatment of people at risk.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0033291707002620

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDuberstein, P R-
dc.contributor.authorPalsson, S P-
dc.contributor.authorWaern, M-
dc.contributor.authorSkoog, I-
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-05T11:42:26Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-05T11:42:26Z-
dc.date.issued2008-05-01-
dc.date.submitted2008-06-05-
dc.identifier.citationPersonality and risk for depression in a birth cohort of 70-year-olds followed for 15 years. 2008, 38 (5):663-71notPsychol Meden
dc.identifier.issn0033-2917-
dc.identifier.pmid18237453-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033291707002620-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/29581-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The association between personality traits and the first lifetime onset of clinically significant depression has not been studied in older adults. METHOD: Experienced psychiatrists conducted interviews and chart reviews at baseline and throughout the 15-year follow-up period. Survival analyses were conducted on the presence/absence of a DSM-III-R mood disorder at follow-up. RESULTS: There were 59 cases of first lifetime episodes of depression. Analyses showed that Neuroticism [hazard ratio (HR) per one point increase in the Maudsley Personality Inventory (MPI)=1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.08] but not Extroversion (HR 1.02, 95% CI 0.97-1.06) amplified risk for mood disorder. CONCLUSIONS: This prospective study on a randomly sampled birth cohort of older adults showed that Neuroticism confers risk for a first lifetime episode of clinically significant depression. Findings have implications for understanding the etiology of late-life depression (LLD) and could also aid in the identification and treatment of people at risk.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0033291707002620en
dc.subject.meshDepressionen
dc.subject.meshAgingen
dc.subject.meshNeurotic Disordersen
dc.titlePersonality and risk for depression in a birth cohort of 70-year-olds followed for 15 yearsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPsychological medicineen
dc.rights.embargodate2000-04-05-

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