2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/297943
Title:
Knee replacement.
Authors:
Carr, Andrew J; Robertsson, Otto; Graves, Stephen; Price, Andrew J; Arden, Nigel K; Judge, Andrew; Beard, David J
Citation:
Lancet 2012, 379(9823):1331-40 Lancet
Issue Date:
7-Apr-2012
Abstract:
Knee-replacement surgery is frequently done and highly successful. It relieves pain and improves knee function in people with advanced arthritis of the joint. The most common indication for the procedure is osteoarthritis. We review the epidemiology of and risk factors for knee replacement. Because replacement is increasingly considered for patients younger than 55 years, improved decision making about whether a patient should undergo the procedure is needed. We discuss assessment of surgery outcomes based on data for revision surgery from national joint-replacement registries and on patient-reported outcome measures. Widespread surveillance of existing implants is urgently needed alongside the carefully monitored introduction of new implant designs. Developments for the future are improved delivery of care and training for surgeons and clinical teams. In an increasingly ageing society, the demand for knee-replacement surgery will probably rise further, and we predict future trends. We also emphasise the need for new strategies to treat early-stage osteoarthritis, which will ultimately reduce the demand for joint-replacement surgery.
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(11)60752-6
Rights:
Archived with thanks to Lancet

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCarr, Andrew Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRobertsson, Ottoen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGraves, Stephenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPrice, Andrew Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorArden, Nigel Ken_GB
dc.contributor.authorJudge, Andrewen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBeard, David Jen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-12T15:49:36Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-12T15:49:36Z-
dc.date.issued2012-04-07-
dc.date.submitted2013-08-13-
dc.identifier.citationLancet 2012, 379(9823):1331-40 Lanceten_GB
dc.identifier.issn1474-547X-
dc.identifier.pmid22398175-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0140-6736(11)60752-6-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/297943-
dc.description.abstractKnee-replacement surgery is frequently done and highly successful. It relieves pain and improves knee function in people with advanced arthritis of the joint. The most common indication for the procedure is osteoarthritis. We review the epidemiology of and risk factors for knee replacement. Because replacement is increasingly considered for patients younger than 55 years, improved decision making about whether a patient should undergo the procedure is needed. We discuss assessment of surgery outcomes based on data for revision surgery from national joint-replacement registries and on patient-reported outcome measures. Widespread surveillance of existing implants is urgently needed alongside the carefully monitored introduction of new implant designs. Developments for the future are improved delivery of care and training for surgeons and clinical teams. In an increasingly ageing society, the demand for knee-replacement surgery will probably rise further, and we predict future trends. We also emphasise the need for new strategies to treat early-stage osteoarthritis, which will ultimately reduce the demand for joint-replacement surgery.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(11)60752-6en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Lanceten_GB
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshArthroplasty, Replacement, Kneeen_GB
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_GB
dc.subject.meshDecision Makingen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshKnee Prosthesisen_GB
dc.subject.meshOsteoarthritis, Kneeen_GB
dc.subject.meshOutcome Assessment (Health Care)en_GB
dc.subject.meshPatient Selectionen_GB
dc.subject.meshQuality-Adjusted Life Yearsen_GB
dc.subject.meshRegistriesen_GB
dc.subject.meshReoperationen_GB
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_GB
dc.titleKnee replacement.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalLanceten_GB
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
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