Trends in depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms and visits to healthcare specialists: A national study among Icelandic adolescents.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/29975
Title:
Trends in depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms and visits to healthcare specialists: A national study among Icelandic adolescents.
Authors:
Sigfusdottir, Inga D; Asgeirsdottir, Bryndis B; Sigurdsson, Jon F; Gudjonsson, Gisli H
Citation:
Scand J Public Health. 2008, 36(4):361-8
Issue Date:
1-Jul-2008
Abstract:
AIMS: The aim of the study was to examine trends in adolescent depression and anxiety symptoms from 1997 to 2006, using four time-points (1997, 2000, 2003, and 2006), and adolescent mental health service use in the same period, using three time-points (1997, 2000, and 2006). METHODS: Four cross-sectional population-based samples of 14- and 15-year-old students, attending the compulsory 9th and 10th grades of the Icelandic secondary school system, completed questionnaires relating to mental health. In total, 21,245 students participated in the four studies. RESULTS: Anxiety symptoms increased significantly for both boys and girls, throughout the period from 1997 to 2006. Depressive symptoms increased significantly for girls, while there were no significant changes in depression among boys. During the same time period, the proportion of adolescents who visited healthcare specialists, i.e. psychiatrists, psychologists and social workers, increased significantly. The results revealed that regular visits (six times or more during 1 year) to psychiatrists and psychologists increased significantly over the same period among girls but not among boys. CONCLUSIONS: The findings show that symptoms of depression and anxiety have increased among adolescents in Iceland. Future work would benefit from further research into the trends in risk and protective factors associated with these outcomes. The findings call particular attention to the increasing risk for depression and anxiety symptoms among girls.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://sjp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/36/4/361

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSigfusdottir, Inga D-
dc.contributor.authorAsgeirsdottir, Bryndis B-
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, Jon F-
dc.contributor.authorGudjonsson, Gisli H-
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T13:26:11Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-12T13:26:11Z-
dc.date.issued2008-07-01-
dc.date.submitted2008-06-12-
dc.identifier.citationScand J Public Health. 2008, 36(4):361-8en
dc.identifier.issn1403-4948-
dc.identifier.pmid18539690-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1403494807088457-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/29975-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractAIMS: The aim of the study was to examine trends in adolescent depression and anxiety symptoms from 1997 to 2006, using four time-points (1997, 2000, 2003, and 2006), and adolescent mental health service use in the same period, using three time-points (1997, 2000, and 2006). METHODS: Four cross-sectional population-based samples of 14- and 15-year-old students, attending the compulsory 9th and 10th grades of the Icelandic secondary school system, completed questionnaires relating to mental health. In total, 21,245 students participated in the four studies. RESULTS: Anxiety symptoms increased significantly for both boys and girls, throughout the period from 1997 to 2006. Depressive symptoms increased significantly for girls, while there were no significant changes in depression among boys. During the same time period, the proportion of adolescents who visited healthcare specialists, i.e. psychiatrists, psychologists and social workers, increased significantly. The results revealed that regular visits (six times or more during 1 year) to psychiatrists and psychologists increased significantly over the same period among girls but not among boys. CONCLUSIONS: The findings show that symptoms of depression and anxiety have increased among adolescents in Iceland. Future work would benefit from further research into the trends in risk and protective factors associated with these outcomes. The findings call particular attention to the increasing risk for depression and anxiety symptoms among girls.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSage Publicationsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://sjp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/36/4/361en
dc.subject.meshAnxiety Disordersen
dc.subject.meshDepressionen
dc.subject.meshHealth Servicesen
dc.subject.meshMental Healthen
dc.titleTrends in depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms and visits to healthcare specialists: A national study among Icelandic adolescents.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Health and Education, Reykjavik University, Reykjavik, Iceland. ingadora@ru.is.en
dc.identifier.journalScandinavian journal of public healthen

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