Occurrence of Campylobacter spp. in cecal contents among commercial broilers in iceland

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/3032
Title:
Occurrence of Campylobacter spp. in cecal contents among commercial broilers in iceland
Authors:
Stern, N J; Reiersen, J; Lowman, R; Bisaillon, J-R; Fridriksdottir, V; Gunnarsson, E; Hiett, K L
Citation:
Foodborne Pathog. Dis. 2005, 2(1):82-9
Issue Date:
1-May-2005
Abstract:
Campylobacter jejuni remains the most frequently reported bacterial cause of human gastroenteritis in Nordic countries. The primary source of transmission to humans is suggested as mishandled raw poultry or consuming improperly prepared chicken. The focus of this report was to characterize the prevalence and cell numbers of the organism within the commercial Icelandic poultry industry. Commercial broiler flocks were sampled from May 2001 through 2003 in a total population study. At the slaughter plant, 40 randomly selected ceca were obtained from each flock, pooled into four samples containing 10 ceca each, and analyzed. Cell numbers and prevalence of Campylobacter spp. were estimated by direct plating of dilutions onto Campy-Cefex agar and incubating the plates at 42 degrees C under microaerobic atmosphere; colonies were confirmed as Campylobacter spp. by microscopy and latex agglutination to provide quantification of cell numbers per gm of cecal material. A total of 15.4% of the flocks carried the organism at at a maximum cell number of 8.1 x 10(7) cfu/g, having a mean raw count of colonized birds at 1.3 x 10(7) cfu/g (geometric mean of 1.5 x 10(6)). During the 3 years of sampling, the prevalence ranged from 17.6% to 17.3% to 12.7% for slaughter years 2001, 2002, and 2003, respectively. Isolation rates varied with numbers of catch lots (groups of birds taken for slaughter)/flock; with one catch lot/flock, the prevalence was 13.7%, with two 17.5%, and with three 33.3%. With increased flock size, isolation rates also increased; flocks of greater than 5,000 birds had a prevalence of 12.0% positive, 14.0% of flocks with 5,000-10,000 birds were positive, and 25.5% of flocks with more than 10,000 birds were positive for Campylobacter spp. Isolation rates varied with the processing lines: M was positive at 17.3%, B was positive at 10.1%, and G at 17.2%. Flocks were more frequently colonized in the warmer months, and younger birds were less frequently colonized than were older slaughtered birds. This study provides descriptive microbiology pertaining to Iceland broilers in a total population study.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://www.liebertonline.com/doi/abs/10.1089/fpd.2005.2.82

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorStern, N J-
dc.contributor.authorReiersen, J-
dc.contributor.authorLowman, R-
dc.contributor.authorBisaillon, J-R-
dc.contributor.authorFridriksdottir, V-
dc.contributor.authorGunnarsson, E-
dc.contributor.authorHiett, K L-
dc.date.accessioned2006-06-07T23:09:07Z-
dc.date.available2006-06-07T23:09:07Z-
dc.date.issued2005-05-01-
dc.identifier.citationFoodborne Pathog. Dis. 2005, 2(1):82-9en
dc.identifier.issn1535-3141-
dc.identifier.pmid15992302-
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/fpd.2005.2.82-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/3032-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractCampylobacter jejuni remains the most frequently reported bacterial cause of human gastroenteritis in Nordic countries. The primary source of transmission to humans is suggested as mishandled raw poultry or consuming improperly prepared chicken. The focus of this report was to characterize the prevalence and cell numbers of the organism within the commercial Icelandic poultry industry. Commercial broiler flocks were sampled from May 2001 through 2003 in a total population study. At the slaughter plant, 40 randomly selected ceca were obtained from each flock, pooled into four samples containing 10 ceca each, and analyzed. Cell numbers and prevalence of Campylobacter spp. were estimated by direct plating of dilutions onto Campy-Cefex agar and incubating the plates at 42 degrees C under microaerobic atmosphere; colonies were confirmed as Campylobacter spp. by microscopy and latex agglutination to provide quantification of cell numbers per gm of cecal material. A total of 15.4% of the flocks carried the organism at at a maximum cell number of 8.1 x 10(7) cfu/g, having a mean raw count of colonized birds at 1.3 x 10(7) cfu/g (geometric mean of 1.5 x 10(6)). During the 3 years of sampling, the prevalence ranged from 17.6% to 17.3% to 12.7% for slaughter years 2001, 2002, and 2003, respectively. Isolation rates varied with numbers of catch lots (groups of birds taken for slaughter)/flock; with one catch lot/flock, the prevalence was 13.7%, with two 17.5%, and with three 33.3%. With increased flock size, isolation rates also increased; flocks of greater than 5,000 birds had a prevalence of 12.0% positive, 14.0% of flocks with 5,000-10,000 birds were positive, and 25.5% of flocks with more than 10,000 birds were positive for Campylobacter spp. Isolation rates varied with the processing lines: M was positive at 17.3%, B was positive at 10.1%, and G at 17.2%. Flocks were more frequently colonized in the warmer months, and younger birds were less frequently colonized than were older slaughtered birds. This study provides descriptive microbiology pertaining to Iceland broilers in a total population study.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.liebertonline.com/doi/abs/10.1089/fpd.2005.2.82en
dc.subjectCampylobacteren
dc.subjectCecumen
dc.subjectChickensen
dc.subjectFood Microbiologyen
dc.subjectAbattoirsen
dc.subjectCampylobacter jejunien
dc.subjectColony Count, Microbialen
dc.subjectConsumer Product Safetyen
dc.subjectIceland/epidemiologyen
dc.subjectPrevalenceen
dc.subjectSeasonsen
dc.subjectAge Factorsen
dc.subjectAnimalsen
dc.subjectResearch Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.en
dc.titleOccurrence of Campylobacter spp. in cecal contents among commercial broilers in icelanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalFoodborne pathogens and diseaseen
dc.format.digYES-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Hirsla are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.