Are impaired childhood motor skills a risk factor for adolescent anxiety? Results from the 1958 U.K. birth cohort and the National Child Development Study.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/30573
Title:
Are impaired childhood motor skills a risk factor for adolescent anxiety? Results from the 1958 U.K. birth cohort and the National Child Development Study.
Authors:
Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Van Os, Jim; Fombonne, Eric
Citation:
Am J Psychiatry 2002, 159(6):1044-6
Issue Date:
1-Jun-2002
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: Neurodevelopmental impairments have been associated with early-onset schizophrenia, early-onset bipolar disorder, and childhood-onset affective disorder. The authors investigated whether delayed childhood motor skills predicted persistent anxiety in adolescence among 6,850 subjects from a national 1958 U.K. birth cohort. METHOD: This historic cohort study used data from the National Child Development Study that was collected when its subjects were 7, 11, and 16 years old. RESULTS: Boys with poor motor skills had more than threefold the odds of maternally rated anxiety at the ages of 11 and 16, but no effect was observed for girls. CONCLUSIONS: Childhood motor impairment was strongly associated with persistent anxiety among male, but not among female, adolescents. The effect modification by sex was greater than expected, as was the effect size for boys. Both findings warrant replication and further examination.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/abstract/159/6/1044

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, Engilbert-
dc.contributor.authorVan Os, Jim-
dc.contributor.authorFombonne, Eric-
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-27T11:08:11Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-27T11:08:11Z-
dc.date.issued2002-06-01-
dc.date.submitted2008-06-27-
dc.identifier.citationAm J Psychiatry 2002, 159(6):1044-6en
dc.identifier.issn0002-953X-
dc.identifier.pmid12042195-
dc.identifier.doi10.1176/appi.ajp.159.6.1044-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/30573-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Neurodevelopmental impairments have been associated with early-onset schizophrenia, early-onset bipolar disorder, and childhood-onset affective disorder. The authors investigated whether delayed childhood motor skills predicted persistent anxiety in adolescence among 6,850 subjects from a national 1958 U.K. birth cohort. METHOD: This historic cohort study used data from the National Child Development Study that was collected when its subjects were 7, 11, and 16 years old. RESULTS: Boys with poor motor skills had more than threefold the odds of maternally rated anxiety at the ages of 11 and 16, but no effect was observed for girls. CONCLUSIONS: Childhood motor impairment was strongly associated with persistent anxiety among male, but not among female, adolescents. The effect modification by sex was greater than expected, as was the effect size for boys. Both findings warrant replication and further examination.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/abstract/159/6/1044en
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen
dc.subject.meshAnxiety Disordersen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshGreat Britainen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMotor Skills Disordersen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.titleAre impaired childhood motor skills a risk factor for adolescent anxiety? Results from the 1958 U.K. birth cohort and the National Child Development Study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry, Lanspitali-University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. engilbs@landspitali.isen
dc.identifier.journalAmerican journal of psychiatryen

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