Weight gain in women of normal weight before pregnancy: complications in pregnancy or delivery and birth outcome.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/30718
Title:
Weight gain in women of normal weight before pregnancy: complications in pregnancy or delivery and birth outcome.
Authors:
Thorsdottir, Inga; Torfadottir, Johanna E; Birgisdottir, Bryndis E; Geirsson, Reynir T
Citation:
Obstet Gynecol. 2002, 99(5 Pt 1):799-806
Issue Date:
1-May-2002
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relation between gestational weight gain in women of normal prepregnant weight and complications during pregnancy and delivery in a population with high gestational weight gain and birth weight. METHODS: Healthy women (n = 615) of normal weight before pregnancy (body mass index 19.5-25.5 kg/m(2)) were randomly selected. Maternity records gave information on age, height, prepregnant weight, gestational weight gain, parity, smoking, gestational hypertension and diabetes, preeclampsia, delivery complications, and infants' birth size and health. RESULTS: The mean weight gain in pregnancy was 16.8 +/- 4.9 kg (mean +/- standard deviation). A total of 26.4% of the women had complications, either in pregnancy (9.1%) or delivery (17.3%). Women gaining weight according to the recommendation of the Institute of Medicine (11.5-16.0 kg) had lower frequency of pregnancy-delivery complications than women gaining more than 20.0 kg (P =.017), but did not differ significantly from those gaining 16-20 kg (P >.05). When dividing weight gain in pregnancy into quintiles, a relative risk of 2.69 (95% confidence interval 1.01, 7.18, P =.048) was found for complications in pregnancy in the fourth quintile (17.9-20.8 kg), using the second quintile as reference (12.5-15.5 kg). The mean birth weight was 3778 +/- 496 g. A low weight gain in pregnancy (less than 11.5 kg) was associated with an increased frequency of infants weighing less than 3500 g at birth (P <.01). CONCLUSION: A gestational weight gain of 11.5-16.0 kg (Institute of Medicine recommendation) for women of normal prepregnant weight is related to the lowest risk for pregnancy-delivery complications. In the population studied, the upper limit might be higher (up to 18 kg), and low weight gain should be avoided to optimize birth outcome.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://www.greenjournal.org/cgi/content/abstract/99/5/799

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThorsdottir, Inga-
dc.contributor.authorTorfadottir, Johanna E-
dc.contributor.authorBirgisdottir, Bryndis E-
dc.contributor.authorGeirsson, Reynir T-
dc.date.accessioned2008-07-01T11:39:32Z-
dc.date.available2008-07-01T11:39:32Z-
dc.date.issued2002-05-01-
dc.date.submitted2008-08-01-
dc.identifier.citationObstet Gynecol. 2002, 99(5 Pt 1):799-806en
dc.identifier.issn0029-7844-
dc.identifier.pmid11978290-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0029-7844(02)01946-4-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/30718-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To investigate the relation between gestational weight gain in women of normal prepregnant weight and complications during pregnancy and delivery in a population with high gestational weight gain and birth weight. METHODS: Healthy women (n = 615) of normal weight before pregnancy (body mass index 19.5-25.5 kg/m(2)) were randomly selected. Maternity records gave information on age, height, prepregnant weight, gestational weight gain, parity, smoking, gestational hypertension and diabetes, preeclampsia, delivery complications, and infants' birth size and health. RESULTS: The mean weight gain in pregnancy was 16.8 +/- 4.9 kg (mean +/- standard deviation). A total of 26.4% of the women had complications, either in pregnancy (9.1%) or delivery (17.3%). Women gaining weight according to the recommendation of the Institute of Medicine (11.5-16.0 kg) had lower frequency of pregnancy-delivery complications than women gaining more than 20.0 kg (P =.017), but did not differ significantly from those gaining 16-20 kg (P >.05). When dividing weight gain in pregnancy into quintiles, a relative risk of 2.69 (95% confidence interval 1.01, 7.18, P =.048) was found for complications in pregnancy in the fourth quintile (17.9-20.8 kg), using the second quintile as reference (12.5-15.5 kg). The mean birth weight was 3778 +/- 496 g. A low weight gain in pregnancy (less than 11.5 kg) was associated with an increased frequency of infants weighing less than 3500 g at birth (P <.01). CONCLUSION: A gestational weight gain of 11.5-16.0 kg (Institute of Medicine recommendation) for women of normal prepregnant weight is related to the lowest risk for pregnancy-delivery complications. In the population studied, the upper limit might be higher (up to 18 kg), and low weight gain should be avoided to optimize birth outcome.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkinsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.greenjournal.org/cgi/content/abstract/99/5/799en
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshBody Heighten
dc.subject.meshDelivery, Obstetricen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshMaternal Ageen
dc.subject.meshObstetric Labor Complicationsen
dc.subject.meshParityen
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Complicationsen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.subject.meshWeight Gainen
dc.titleWeight gain in women of normal weight before pregnancy: complications in pregnancy or delivery and birth outcome.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUnit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali-University Hospital, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. ingathor@landspitali.iesen
dc.identifier.journalObstetrics and gynecologyen

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