Fifteen percent of myocardial infarctions and coronary revascularizations explained by family history unrelated to conventional risk factors. The Reykjavik Cohort Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/31254
Title:
Fifteen percent of myocardial infarctions and coronary revascularizations explained by family history unrelated to conventional risk factors. The Reykjavik Cohort Study
Authors:
Andresdottir, M B; Sigurdsson, G; Sigvaldason, H; Gudnason, V
Citation:
Eur. Heart J. 2002, 23(21):1655-63
Issue Date:
1-Nov-2002
Abstract:
Aims To examine the relationship between history of myocardial infarction in first-degree relatives and the risk of developing coronary heart disease (myocardial infarction or coronary revascularization).Methods and Results A total of 9328 males and 10062 females, randomly selected residents of the Reykjavik area, aged 33-81 years, were examined in the period from 1967 to 1996 in a prospective cohort study. Cardiovascular risk assessment was based on characteristics at baseline. Information on history of myocardial infarction in first-degree relatives was obtained from a health questionnaire. Mean follow-up was 18 and 19 years for men and women, respectively. During follow-up 2700 men and 1070 women developed coronary heart disease. Compared with subjects without a family history, the hazard ratio of coronary heart disease was 1.75 (95% confidence interval, CI, 1.59-1.92) for men and 1.83 (95% CI, 1.60-2.11) for women, with one or more first-degree relatives with myocardial infarction. The risk factor profile was significantly worse in individuals with a positive family history. After allowance for these risk factors, the hazard ratio was still highly significant, 1.66 (CI, 1.51-1.82) and 1.64 (CI, 1.43-1.89) for men and women, respectively. Family history of myocardial infarction was attributed to 15.1% of all cases of coronary heart disease in men and 16.6% in women, independent of other known risk factors.Conclusion Family history of myocardial infarction increases the risk of developing coronary heart disease in both men and women and is largely independent of other classic risk factors. Approximately 15% of all myocardial infarctions can be attributed to familial factors that have not been measured in the study or remain to be elucidated.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://eurheartj.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/23/21/1655

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAndresdottir, M B-
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, G-
dc.contributor.authorSigvaldason, H-
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, V-
dc.date.accessioned2008-07-08T11:40:19Z-
dc.date.available2008-07-08T11:40:19Z-
dc.date.issued2002-11-01-
dc.date.submitted2008-07-08-
dc.identifier.citationEur. Heart J. 2002, 23(21):1655-63en
dc.identifier.issn0195-668X-
dc.identifier.pmid12398822-
dc.identifier.doi10.1053/euhj.2002.3235-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/31254-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractAims To examine the relationship between history of myocardial infarction in first-degree relatives and the risk of developing coronary heart disease (myocardial infarction or coronary revascularization).Methods and Results A total of 9328 males and 10062 females, randomly selected residents of the Reykjavik area, aged 33-81 years, were examined in the period from 1967 to 1996 in a prospective cohort study. Cardiovascular risk assessment was based on characteristics at baseline. Information on history of myocardial infarction in first-degree relatives was obtained from a health questionnaire. Mean follow-up was 18 and 19 years for men and women, respectively. During follow-up 2700 men and 1070 women developed coronary heart disease. Compared with subjects without a family history, the hazard ratio of coronary heart disease was 1.75 (95% confidence interval, CI, 1.59-1.92) for men and 1.83 (95% CI, 1.60-2.11) for women, with one or more first-degree relatives with myocardial infarction. The risk factor profile was significantly worse in individuals with a positive family history. After allowance for these risk factors, the hazard ratio was still highly significant, 1.66 (CI, 1.51-1.82) and 1.64 (CI, 1.43-1.89) for men and women, respectively. Family history of myocardial infarction was attributed to 15.1% of all cases of coronary heart disease in men and 16.6% in women, independent of other known risk factors.Conclusion Family history of myocardial infarction increases the risk of developing coronary heart disease in both men and women and is largely independent of other classic risk factors. Approximately 15% of all myocardial infarctions can be attributed to familial factors that have not been measured in the study or remain to be elucidated.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://eurheartj.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/23/21/1655en
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshBlood Sedimentationen
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen
dc.subject.meshElectrocardiographyen
dc.subject.meshExerciseen
dc.subject.meshFamily Healthen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshMyocardial Infarctionen
dc.subject.meshMyocardial Revascularizationen
dc.subject.meshPedigreeen
dc.subject.meshRisk Assessmenten
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.titleFifteen percent of myocardial infarctions and coronary revascularizations explained by family history unrelated to conventional risk factors. The Reykjavik Cohort Studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentIcelandic Heart Association-Research Institute, Reykjavik, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalEuropean heart journalen

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