2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/31492
Title:
Sleep and sleep habits from childhood to young adulthood over a 10-year period
Authors:
Thorleifsdottir, B; Bjornsson, J K; Benediktsdottir, B; Gislason, T; Kristbjarnarson, H
Citation:
J Psychosom Res. 2002, 53(1):529-37
Issue Date:
1-Jul-2002
Abstract:
The aim of this epidemiological study was to utilise a cross-sectional as well as a longitudinal approach to examine sleep habits and how they develop in young people in Iceland. The 668 subjects (1-20 years) who responded to a postal survey in 1985 were followed up 5 and 10 years later. The majority of the variance in bedtime and sleep duration was explained by age, but also to a considerable degree by other factors such as residence, season, and year of survey or interaction of these factors. Natural phenomena, such as the diminution of total sleep duration in the first years of life and the tendency for longer sleep on weekends compared to weekdays were confirmed. The lengthening of sleep on weekends was first significant at the age of 9 and was greater among adolescents than young adults. The incidence of daytime sleepiness increased in adolescence, as did napping, at which time their nocturnal sleep time significantly decreased. Over a period of 10 years, a significant shift to earlier wake-up times occurred in children up to 15 years of age, which resulted in a shortened total sleep time. The idea that individual sleep duration is an inherent parameter is supported by the high positive correlation of total sleep time across a 10-year period (r=.73). The present data confirm that Icelandic adolescents (aged 11, 13, and 15) have delayed bedtimes and shorter nocturnal sleep compared to European peers.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6T8V-468SWHN-2/1/8cd1dfe05e493f2483839f6e9af59a3c

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThorleifsdottir, B-
dc.contributor.authorBjornsson, J K-
dc.contributor.authorBenediktsdottir, B-
dc.contributor.authorGislason, T-
dc.contributor.authorKristbjarnarson, H-
dc.date.accessioned2008-07-10T10:17:32Z-
dc.date.available2008-07-10T10:17:32Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07-01-
dc.date.submitted2008-07-10-
dc.identifier.citationJ Psychosom Res. 2002, 53(1):529-37en
dc.identifier.issn0022-3999-
dc.identifier.pmid12127168-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0022-3999(02)00444-0-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/31492-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this epidemiological study was to utilise a cross-sectional as well as a longitudinal approach to examine sleep habits and how they develop in young people in Iceland. The 668 subjects (1-20 years) who responded to a postal survey in 1985 were followed up 5 and 10 years later. The majority of the variance in bedtime and sleep duration was explained by age, but also to a considerable degree by other factors such as residence, season, and year of survey or interaction of these factors. Natural phenomena, such as the diminution of total sleep duration in the first years of life and the tendency for longer sleep on weekends compared to weekdays were confirmed. The lengthening of sleep on weekends was first significant at the age of 9 and was greater among adolescents than young adults. The incidence of daytime sleepiness increased in adolescence, as did napping, at which time their nocturnal sleep time significantly decreased. Over a period of 10 years, a significant shift to earlier wake-up times occurred in children up to 15 years of age, which resulted in a shortened total sleep time. The idea that individual sleep duration is an inherent parameter is supported by the high positive correlation of total sleep time across a 10-year period (r=.73). The present data confirm that Icelandic adolescents (aged 11, 13, and 15) have delayed bedtimes and shorter nocturnal sleep compared to European peers.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPergamon Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6T8V-468SWHN-2/1/8cd1dfe05e493f2483839f6e9af59a3cen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshCircadian Rhythmen
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subject.meshDisorders of Excessive Somnolenceen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen
dc.subject.meshHabitsen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshIrelanden
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen
dc.subject.meshSleepen
dc.subject.meshSleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythmen
dc.titleSleep and sleep habits from childhood to young adulthood over a 10-year perioden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSleep Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry, Landspitalinn University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of psychosomatic researchen

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