2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/31493
Title:
Trends in peptic ulcer morbidity and mortality in Iceland.
Authors:
Thors, Hildur; Svanes, Cecilie; Thjodleifsson, Bjarni
Citation:
J Clin Epidemiol. 2002, 55(7):681-6
Issue Date:
1-Jul-2002
Abstract:
A cohort pattern has been demonstrated for ulcer mortality and perforation, pointing to a role of early life factors, while only a period-related decrease has been observed in elective ulcer surgery, which reflects uncomplicated ulcer. The aim of this article was to study whether the susceptibility to peptic ulcer disease is determined early in life, as reflected in a cohort pattern consistent for all ulcer manifestations. The subjects were all patients treated surgically for peptic ulcer (perforations 1962-1990; bleedings 1971-1990; elective surgery 1971-1990) and all deaths from peptic ulcer (perforations and other ulcer deaths 1951-1989) in Iceland. Age-specific incidence and mortality were analyzed graphically by year of birth (cohort) and by year of event (period). The effects of cohort and period on incidence and mortality were analyzed by Poisson regression. Ulcer perforation and bleeding, operative incidence, and mortality, showed a rise and subsequent fall in successive generations, with the highest risks observed in the subjects born after the turn of the 20(th) century. This was confirmed by statistical analyses showing highly significant cohort effects (P <.001) and no period effects. A cohort pattern was similarly found for elective ulcer surgery (P <.001), as well as a period-related decrease across age groups (P <.001). Ulcer complications, ulcer deaths, and uncomplicated ulcer were particularly common in specific generations carrying a high risk of peptic ulcer throughout their lives. These were the generations with the highest prevalence of H. pylori antibodies, the subjects born after the turn of the century at a time of maximum crowding and poor hygiene in Iceland due to the industrial revolution.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6T84-46DP3NC-8/1/1c789efd0d2a8357bab241c6ab91f743

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThors, Hildur-
dc.contributor.authorSvanes, Cecilie-
dc.contributor.authorThjodleifsson, Bjarni-
dc.date.accessioned2008-07-10T11:09:34Z-
dc.date.available2008-07-10T11:09:34Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07-01-
dc.date.submitted2008-07-10-
dc.identifier.citationJ Clin Epidemiol. 2002, 55(7):681-6en
dc.identifier.issn0895-4356-
dc.identifier.pmid12160916-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0895-4356(02)00412-2-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/31493-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractA cohort pattern has been demonstrated for ulcer mortality and perforation, pointing to a role of early life factors, while only a period-related decrease has been observed in elective ulcer surgery, which reflects uncomplicated ulcer. The aim of this article was to study whether the susceptibility to peptic ulcer disease is determined early in life, as reflected in a cohort pattern consistent for all ulcer manifestations. The subjects were all patients treated surgically for peptic ulcer (perforations 1962-1990; bleedings 1971-1990; elective surgery 1971-1990) and all deaths from peptic ulcer (perforations and other ulcer deaths 1951-1989) in Iceland. Age-specific incidence and mortality were analyzed graphically by year of birth (cohort) and by year of event (period). The effects of cohort and period on incidence and mortality were analyzed by Poisson regression. Ulcer perforation and bleeding, operative incidence, and mortality, showed a rise and subsequent fall in successive generations, with the highest risks observed in the subjects born after the turn of the 20(th) century. This was confirmed by statistical analyses showing highly significant cohort effects (P <.001) and no period effects. A cohort pattern was similarly found for elective ulcer surgery (P <.001), as well as a period-related decrease across age groups (P <.001). Ulcer complications, ulcer deaths, and uncomplicated ulcer were particularly common in specific generations carrying a high risk of peptic ulcer throughout their lives. These were the generations with the highest prevalence of H. pylori antibodies, the subjects born after the turn of the century at a time of maximum crowding and poor hygiene in Iceland due to the industrial revolution.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6T84-46DP3NC-8/1/1c789efd0d2a8357bab241c6ab91f743en
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHelicobacter Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshHelicobacter pylorien
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshMorbidityen
dc.subject.meshPeptic Ulceren
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen
dc.titleTrends in peptic ulcer morbidity and mortality in Iceland.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Gastroenterology, National University Hospital, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of clinical epidemiologyen

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