2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/31870
Title:
Genetic factors contribute to the risk of developing endometriosis.
Authors:
Stefansson, H; Geirsson, R T; Steinthorsdottir, V; Jonsson, H; Manolescu, A; Kong, A; Ingadottir, G; Gulcher, J; Stefansson, K
Citation:
Hum. Reprod. 2002, 17(3):555-9
Issue Date:
1-Mar-2002
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Endometriosis is known to cluster within nuclear families. The extent of familial clustering can be evaluated in Iceland with its large population-based genealogical database. METHODS AND RESULTS: Applying several measures of familiality we demonstrated that 750 women with endometriosis were significantly more interrelated than matched control groups. The risk ratio for sisters was 5.20 (P < 0.001) and for cousins 1.56 (P = 0.003). The average kinship coefficient for the patients was significantly higher than that calculated for 1000 sets of 750 matched controls (P < 0.001) and this remained significant when contribution from first-degree relatives was excluded (P < 0.05). The minimum number of ancestors required to account for the group of patients was compared with the minimum number of ancestors required to account for the control groups at different time points in the past. The minimum number of founders for the group of patients was significantly smaller than for the control groups. Affected cousin pairs were as likely to be paternally connected as maternally connected. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first population-based study using an extensive genealogy database to examine the genetic contribution to endometriosis. A genetic factor is present, with a raised risk in close and more distant relatives, and a definite kinship factor with maternal and paternal inheritance contributing.
Description:
Neðst á síðunni er hægt að nálgast greinina í heild sinni með því að smella á hlekkinn View/Open
Additional Links:
http://humrep.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/17/3/555

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorStefansson, H-
dc.contributor.authorGeirsson, R T-
dc.contributor.authorSteinthorsdottir, V-
dc.contributor.authorJonsson, H-
dc.contributor.authorManolescu, A-
dc.contributor.authorKong, A-
dc.contributor.authorIngadottir, G-
dc.contributor.authorGulcher, J-
dc.contributor.authorStefansson, K-
dc.date.accessioned2008-07-14T13:24:45Z-
dc.date.available2008-07-14T13:24:45Z-
dc.date.issued2002-03-01-
dc.date.submitted2008-07-14-
dc.identifier.citationHum. Reprod. 2002, 17(3):555-9en
dc.identifier.issn0268-1161-
dc.identifier.pmid11870102-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/humrep/17.3.555-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/31870-
dc.descriptionNeðst á síðunni er hægt að nálgast greinina í heild sinni með því að smella á hlekkinn View/Openen
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Endometriosis is known to cluster within nuclear families. The extent of familial clustering can be evaluated in Iceland with its large population-based genealogical database. METHODS AND RESULTS: Applying several measures of familiality we demonstrated that 750 women with endometriosis were significantly more interrelated than matched control groups. The risk ratio for sisters was 5.20 (P < 0.001) and for cousins 1.56 (P = 0.003). The average kinship coefficient for the patients was significantly higher than that calculated for 1000 sets of 750 matched controls (P < 0.001) and this remained significant when contribution from first-degree relatives was excluded (P < 0.05). The minimum number of ancestors required to account for the group of patients was compared with the minimum number of ancestors required to account for the control groups at different time points in the past. The minimum number of founders for the group of patients was significantly smaller than for the control groups. Affected cousin pairs were as likely to be paternally connected as maternally connected. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first population-based study using an extensive genealogy database to examine the genetic contribution to endometriosis. A genetic factor is present, with a raised risk in close and more distant relatives, and a definite kinship factor with maternal and paternal inheritance contributing.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://humrep.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/17/3/555en
dc.subject.meshCluster Analysisen
dc.subject.meshDatabases, Factualen
dc.subject.meshEndometriosisen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshGenealogy and Heraldryen
dc.subject.meshGenetic Predisposition to Diseaseen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshOdds Ratioen
dc.subject.meshPedigreeen
dc.subject.meshReference Valuesen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.titleGenetic factors contribute to the risk of developing endometriosis.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDeCode Genetics, Lynghals 1, Reykjavik, IS-110, Iceland. hreinn@decode.isen
dc.identifier.journalHuman reproduction (Oxford, England)en

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