2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/3193
Title:
Acidification of distal esophagus and sleep-related breathing disturbances
Authors:
Berg, Soren; Hoffstein, Victor; Gislason, Thorarinn
Citation:
Chest 2004, 125(6):2101-6
Issue Date:
2004
Abstract:
STUDY OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether distal esophageal acidification occurs during sleep in patients suspected of sleep-disordered breathing, and whether such acidification is related to respiratory abnormalities. DESIGN AND PATIENTS: Fourteen middle-aged, snoring men all complaining of daytime sleepiness and suspected of having obstructive sleep apnea. SETTING: Sleep laboratory, Pulmonary Department, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Each patient underwent full nocturnal polysomnography testing, which included continuous monitoring of esophageal pressure (Pes) and pH. We identified all pH events, which were defined as a reduction in esophageal pH of >/= 1.0. During each pH event, the respiratory recordings where examined for the presence of apneas or hypopneas, and Pes was recorded. The data were analyzed to determine the possible relationships between pH events and respiratory events, and between changes in pH and changes in Pes. We found that there were more respiratory events than pH events. The mean (+/- SD) number of apneas and hypopneas per hour of sleep was 33 +/- 22, whereas the mean number of pH events per hour of sleep was 7 +/- 6. Overall, 81% of all pH events were associated with respiratory events. Correlation analysis did not reveal any significant relationship between pH events and the magnitude of Pes or apnea-hypopnea index. CONCLUSIONS: Episodes of esophageal acidification are common in patients with sleep apnea, and are usually associated with respiratory and pressure events. However, changes in pH were independent of the magnitude of the Pes.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://www.chestjournal.org/cgi/content/abstract/125/6/2101

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBerg, Soren-
dc.contributor.authorHoffstein, Victor-
dc.contributor.authorGislason, Thorarinn-
dc.date.accessioned2006-06-28T11:50:44Z-
dc.date.available2006-06-28T11:50:44Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationChest 2004, 125(6):2101-6en
dc.identifier.issn0012-3692-
dc.identifier.pmid15189928-
dc.identifier.otherPAD12en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/3193-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractSTUDY OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether distal esophageal acidification occurs during sleep in patients suspected of sleep-disordered breathing, and whether such acidification is related to respiratory abnormalities. DESIGN AND PATIENTS: Fourteen middle-aged, snoring men all complaining of daytime sleepiness and suspected of having obstructive sleep apnea. SETTING: Sleep laboratory, Pulmonary Department, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Each patient underwent full nocturnal polysomnography testing, which included continuous monitoring of esophageal pressure (Pes) and pH. We identified all pH events, which were defined as a reduction in esophageal pH of >/= 1.0. During each pH event, the respiratory recordings where examined for the presence of apneas or hypopneas, and Pes was recorded. The data were analyzed to determine the possible relationships between pH events and respiratory events, and between changes in pH and changes in Pes. We found that there were more respiratory events than pH events. The mean (+/- SD) number of apneas and hypopneas per hour of sleep was 33 +/- 22, whereas the mean number of pH events per hour of sleep was 7 +/- 6. Overall, 81% of all pH events were associated with respiratory events. Correlation analysis did not reveal any significant relationship between pH events and the magnitude of Pes or apnea-hypopnea index. CONCLUSIONS: Episodes of esophageal acidification are common in patients with sleep apnea, and are usually associated with respiratory and pressure events. However, changes in pH were independent of the magnitude of the Pes.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican College of Chest Physiciansen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.chestjournal.org/cgi/content/abstract/125/6/2101en
dc.subjectCohort Studiesen
dc.subjectComorbidityen
dc.subjectDisorders of Excessiveen
dc.subjectSomnolenceen
dc.subjectEsophagusen
dc.subjectFollow-Up Studiesen
dc.subjectGastroesophagealen
dc.subjectRefluxen
dc.subjectHydrogen-Ion Concentrationen
dc.subjectMonitoring, Physiologicen
dc.subjectPolysomnographyen
dc.subjectPressureen
dc.subjectProbabilityen
dc.subjectRisk Assessmenten
dc.subjectSeverity of Illness Indexen
dc.subjectSleep Apnea, Obstructiveen
dc.subjectSleep Stagesen
dc.titleAcidification of distal esophagus and sleep-related breathing disturbancesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalChesten
dc.format.digYES-

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