Nursing diagnosis taxonomy across the Atlantic Ocean: congruence between nurses' charting and the NANDA taxonomy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/32034
Title:
Nursing diagnosis taxonomy across the Atlantic Ocean: congruence between nurses' charting and the NANDA taxonomy
Authors:
Thoroddsen, A; Thorsteinsson, H S
Citation:
J Adv Nurs. 2002, 37(4):372-81
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2002
Abstract:
PURPOSE AND AIMS: The purpose of this study was to analyse expressions or terms used by nurses in Iceland to describe patient problems. The classification of NANDA was used as reference. The research questions were: (a) Does NANDA terminology represent patient problems documented by Icelandic nurses? (b) If so, what kind of nursing diagnoses does it represent? (c) What kind of patient problems are not represented by NANDA terminology? (d) What are the most frequent nursing diagnoses used? METHODS: A retrospective chart review was conducted in a 400 bed acute care hospital in Iceland. The sample was defined as nursing diagnosis statements in charts of patients hospitalized in two 6-month periods in two separate years. The data were analysed according to a predefined grading system based on the PES format or Problem -- (A)aetiology -- Signs and symptoms. RESULTS: A total of 1217 charts were used for the study, which yielded 2171 nursing diagnoses statements for analysis. Charts with at least one nursing diagnosis documented were 60.1% and the number of diagnoses per patient ranged from 0 to 10, with 65% of charts with three diagnoses or less. The number of diagnoses correlated with patients' length of stay, but not with increased age of the patients. The average number of statements per patient was 3.28. Almost 60% of the diagnoses were according to NANDA terminology, another 20% were stated as procedures, medical diagnoses or risks for complications. The 20 most frequently used nursing diagnoses accounted for 80% of all diagnoses documented. Discrepancy between nurses' documentation on emotional problems and availability of diagnosis in the NANDA taxonomy was evident. CONCLUSION: It can be concluded that the NANDA taxonomy seems to be culturally relevant for nurses in different cultures.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2648.2002.02101.x

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThoroddsen, A-
dc.contributor.authorThorsteinsson, H S-
dc.date.accessioned2008-07-15T13:31:10Z-
dc.date.available2008-07-15T13:31:10Z-
dc.date.issued2002-02-01-
dc.date.submitted2008-07-15-
dc.identifier.citationJ Adv Nurs. 2002, 37(4):372-81en
dc.identifier.issn0309-2402-
dc.identifier.pmid11872107-
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1365-2648.2002.02101.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/32034-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE AND AIMS: The purpose of this study was to analyse expressions or terms used by nurses in Iceland to describe patient problems. The classification of NANDA was used as reference. The research questions were: (a) Does NANDA terminology represent patient problems documented by Icelandic nurses? (b) If so, what kind of nursing diagnoses does it represent? (c) What kind of patient problems are not represented by NANDA terminology? (d) What are the most frequent nursing diagnoses used? METHODS: A retrospective chart review was conducted in a 400 bed acute care hospital in Iceland. The sample was defined as nursing diagnosis statements in charts of patients hospitalized in two 6-month periods in two separate years. The data were analysed according to a predefined grading system based on the PES format or Problem -- (A)aetiology -- Signs and symptoms. RESULTS: A total of 1217 charts were used for the study, which yielded 2171 nursing diagnoses statements for analysis. Charts with at least one nursing diagnosis documented were 60.1% and the number of diagnoses per patient ranged from 0 to 10, with 65% of charts with three diagnoses or less. The number of diagnoses correlated with patients' length of stay, but not with increased age of the patients. The average number of statements per patient was 3.28. Almost 60% of the diagnoses were according to NANDA terminology, another 20% were stated as procedures, medical diagnoses or risks for complications. The 20 most frequently used nursing diagnoses accounted for 80% of all diagnoses documented. Discrepancy between nurses' documentation on emotional problems and availability of diagnosis in the NANDA taxonomy was evident. CONCLUSION: It can be concluded that the NANDA taxonomy seems to be culturally relevant for nurses in different cultures.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBlackwell Scientific Publicationsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2648.2002.02101.xen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshCultureen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshNursing Diagnosisen
dc.subject.meshNursing Recordsen
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshSocieties, Nursingen
dc.subject.meshTerminology as Topicen
dc.subject.meshVocabulary, Controlleden
dc.titleNursing diagnosis taxonomy across the Atlantic Ocean: congruence between nurses' charting and the NANDA taxonomyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentFaculty of Nursing, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. astat@hi.isen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of advanced nursingen
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