Do lipids, blood pressure, diabetes, and smoking confer equal risk of myocardial infarction in women as in men? The Reykjavik Study.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/32434
Title:
Do lipids, blood pressure, diabetes, and smoking confer equal risk of myocardial infarction in women as in men? The Reykjavik Study.
Authors:
Jonsdottir, Lilja S; Sigfusson, Nikulas; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Sigvaldason, Helgi; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur
Citation:
J Cardiovasc Risk. 2002, 9(2):67-76
Issue Date:
1-Apr-2002
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Studies on coronary risk factors in men and women are mainly based on mortality data and few compare results of both sexes with consistent study design and diagnostic criteria. This study assesses the major risk factors for coronary events in men and women from the Reykjavik Study. DESIGN: Within a prospective, population-based cohort study individuals without history of myocardial infarction were identified and the relative risk of baseline variables was assessed in relation to verified myocardial infarction or coronary death during follow-up. METHODS: Of the 9681 women and 8888 men who attended risk assessment from 1967-1991, with follow-up period of up to 28 years, 706 women and 1700 men suffered a non-fatal myocardial infarction or coronary death. RESULTS: Serum cholesterol was a significant risk factor for both sexes, with hazard ratios (HR) decreasing with age. Systolic blood pressure was a stronger risk factor for women as was ECG-confirmed left ventricular hypertrophy (women HR 2.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.67-5.01; men HR 1.11 [CI 0.86-1.43]). Fasting blood glucose > or =6.7 mmol/L identified significantly higher risk for women (HR 2.65) than men (HR 2.08) as did self-reported diabetes. Triglyceride risk was significantly higher for women and decreased significantly with age. Smoking increased risk two- to five-fold, increasing with dose, for women, which was significantly higher than the doubling in risk for men. CONCLUSIONS: This large study of the major risk factors compared between the sexes demonstrates similar relative risk of myocardial infarction associated with cholesterol for both sexes, however, the relative risk is higher in women for many other risk factors such as smoking, diabetes, elevated triglycerides and left ventricular hypertrophy.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
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Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJonsdottir, Lilja S-
dc.contributor.authorSigfusson, Nikulas-
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, Vilmundur-
dc.contributor.authorSigvaldason, Helgi-
dc.contributor.authorThorgeirsson, Gudmundur-
dc.date.accessioned2008-07-18T10:55:47Z-
dc.date.available2008-07-18T10:55:47Z-
dc.date.issued2002-04-01-
dc.date.submitted2008-07-18-
dc.identifier.citationJ Cardiovasc Risk. 2002, 9(2):67-76en
dc.identifier.issn1350-6277-
dc.identifier.pmid12006913-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/32434-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Studies on coronary risk factors in men and women are mainly based on mortality data and few compare results of both sexes with consistent study design and diagnostic criteria. This study assesses the major risk factors for coronary events in men and women from the Reykjavik Study. DESIGN: Within a prospective, population-based cohort study individuals without history of myocardial infarction were identified and the relative risk of baseline variables was assessed in relation to verified myocardial infarction or coronary death during follow-up. METHODS: Of the 9681 women and 8888 men who attended risk assessment from 1967-1991, with follow-up period of up to 28 years, 706 women and 1700 men suffered a non-fatal myocardial infarction or coronary death. RESULTS: Serum cholesterol was a significant risk factor for both sexes, with hazard ratios (HR) decreasing with age. Systolic blood pressure was a stronger risk factor for women as was ECG-confirmed left ventricular hypertrophy (women HR 2.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.67-5.01; men HR 1.11 [CI 0.86-1.43]). Fasting blood glucose > or =6.7 mmol/L identified significantly higher risk for women (HR 2.65) than men (HR 2.08) as did self-reported diabetes. Triglyceride risk was significantly higher for women and decreased significantly with age. Smoking increased risk two- to five-fold, increasing with dose, for women, which was significantly higher than the doubling in risk for men. CONCLUSIONS: This large study of the major risk factors compared between the sexes demonstrates similar relative risk of myocardial infarction associated with cholesterol for both sexes, however, the relative risk is higher in women for many other risk factors such as smoking, diabetes, elevated triglycerides and left ventricular hypertrophy.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkinsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&NEWS=N&PAGE=fulltext&AN=00043798-200204000-00001&LSLINK=80&D=ovften
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen
dc.subject.meshBiological Markersen
dc.subject.meshBlood Glucoseen
dc.subject.meshBlood Pressureen
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Complicationsen
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitusen
dc.subject.meshElectrocardiographyen
dc.subject.meshEndpoint Determinationen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshHypertrophy, Left Ventricularen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshLipidsen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshMultivariate Analysisen
dc.subject.meshMyocardial Infarctionen
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen
dc.subject.meshSmokingen
dc.subject.meshWomen's Healthen
dc.titleDo lipids, blood pressure, diabetes, and smoking confer equal risk of myocardial infarction in women as in men? The Reykjavik Study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHeart Preventive Clinic, Icelandic Heart Association, Holtasmári 1, 201 Kópavogur, Iceland, University Hospital, Hringbraut, 101 Reykjavík, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of cardiovascular risken
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