2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/3255
Title:
The influence of active and passive smoking on habitual snoring
Authors:
Franklin, Karl A; Gislason, Thorarinn; Omenaas, Ernst; Jõgi, Rain; Jensen, Erik Juel; Lindberg, Eva; Gunnbjörnsdóttir, Maria; Nyström, Lennarth; Laerum, Birger N; Björnsson, Eythor; Torén, Kjell; Janson, Christer
Citation:
Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 2004, 170(7):799-803
Issue Date:
2004
Abstract:
The impact of active smoking, passive smoking, and obesity on habitual snoring in the population is mainly unknown. We aimed to study the relationship of habitual snoring with active and passive tobacco smoking in a population-based sample. A total of 15,555 of 21,802 (71%) randomly selected men and women aged 25-54 years from Iceland, Estonia, Denmark, Norway, and Sweden answered a postal questionnaire. Habitual snoring, defined as loud and disturbing snoring at least 3 nights a week, was more prevalent among current smokers (24.0%, p < 0.0001) and ex-smokers (20.3%, p < 0.0001) than in never-smokers (13.7%). Snoring was also more prevalent in never-smokers exposed to passive smoking at home on a daily basis than in never-smokers without this exposure (19.8% vs. 13.3%, p < 0.0001). The frequency of habitual snoring increased with the amount of tobacco smoked. Active smoking and passive smoking were related to snoring, independent of obesity, sex, center, and age. Ever smoking accounted for 17.1% of the attributable risk of habitual snoring, obesity (body mass index > or = 30 kg/m(2)) for 4.3%, and passive smoking for 2.2%. Smoking, both current and ex-smoking, is a major contributor to habitual snoring in the general population. Passive smoking is a previously unrecognized risk factor for snoring among adults.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://ajrccm.atsjournals.org/cgi/content/full/170/7/799

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFranklin, Karl A-
dc.contributor.authorGislason, Thorarinn-
dc.contributor.authorOmenaas, Ernst-
dc.contributor.authorJõgi, Rain-
dc.contributor.authorJensen, Erik Juel-
dc.contributor.authorLindberg, Eva-
dc.contributor.authorGunnbjörnsdóttir, Maria-
dc.contributor.authorNyström, Lennarth-
dc.contributor.authorLaerum, Birger N-
dc.contributor.authorBjörnsson, Eythor-
dc.contributor.authorTorén, Kjell-
dc.contributor.authorJanson, Christer-
dc.date.accessioned2006-07-03T10:58:56Z-
dc.date.available2006-07-03T10:58:56Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationAm. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 2004, 170(7):799-803en
dc.identifier.issn1073-449X-
dc.identifier.pmid15242843-
dc.identifier.doi10.1164/rccm.200404-474OC-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/3255-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractThe impact of active smoking, passive smoking, and obesity on habitual snoring in the population is mainly unknown. We aimed to study the relationship of habitual snoring with active and passive tobacco smoking in a population-based sample. A total of 15,555 of 21,802 (71%) randomly selected men and women aged 25-54 years from Iceland, Estonia, Denmark, Norway, and Sweden answered a postal questionnaire. Habitual snoring, defined as loud and disturbing snoring at least 3 nights a week, was more prevalent among current smokers (24.0%, p < 0.0001) and ex-smokers (20.3%, p < 0.0001) than in never-smokers (13.7%). Snoring was also more prevalent in never-smokers exposed to passive smoking at home on a daily basis than in never-smokers without this exposure (19.8% vs. 13.3%, p < 0.0001). The frequency of habitual snoring increased with the amount of tobacco smoked. Active smoking and passive smoking were related to snoring, independent of obesity, sex, center, and age. Ever smoking accounted for 17.1% of the attributable risk of habitual snoring, obesity (body mass index > or = 30 kg/m(2)) for 4.3%, and passive smoking for 2.2%. Smoking, both current and ex-smoking, is a major contributor to habitual snoring in the general population. Passive smoking is a previously unrecognized risk factor for snoring among adults.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Thoracic Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://ajrccm.atsjournals.org/cgi/content/full/170/7/799en
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectAge Distributionen
dc.subjectBody Mass Indexen
dc.subjectBronchitisen
dc.subjectChronic Diseaseen
dc.subjectEstoniaen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectHealth Surveysen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectIcelanden
dc.subjectIncidenceen
dc.subjectLogistic Modelsen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden
dc.subjectObesityen
dc.subjectPopulation Surveillanceen
dc.subjectPrevalenceen
dc.subjectQuestionnairesen
dc.subjectResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'ten
dc.subjectRisk Factorsen
dc.subjectScandinavia/epidemiologyen
dc.subjectSex Distributionen
dc.subjectSmokingen
dc.subjectSnoringen
dc.subjectTobacco Smoke Pollutionen
dc.titleThe influence of active and passive smoking on habitual snoringen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES-

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