Fat-soluble vitamins in the maternal diet, influence of cod liver oil supplementation and impact of the maternal diet on human milk composition.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/33334
Title:
Fat-soluble vitamins in the maternal diet, influence of cod liver oil supplementation and impact of the maternal diet on human milk composition.
Authors:
Olafsdottir, AS; Wagner, KH; Thorsdottir, I; Elmadfa, I
Citation:
Ann. Nutr. Metab. 2001, 45(6):265-72
Issue Date:
2001
Abstract:
BACKGROUND/AIMS: To investigate lactating mothers' intake of fat-soluble vitamins in free-living subjects and to what extent cod liver oil supplementation influences the maternal intake in a population with common intake of cod liver oil. The impact of maternal diet on the concentration of fat-soluble vitamins in human milk was studied. METHODS: Dietary intake of 77 lactating women was investigated by 24-hour diet recalls and breast-milk samples were taken at the same occasions. Breast milk samples were analyzed for fat-soluble vitamins. RESULTS: The median intakes were 927 microg/day for vitamin A, 5.5 mg/day for vitamin E and 3.3 microg/day for vitamin D. Maternal vitamin A, E and D intakes were higher when the diet was supplemented with cod liver oil. Icelandic breast milk was found to have high contents of vitamin A and E. Only vitamin D was too low in breast milk to meet the recommended intake for infants. Retinylpalmitate in relation to lipids correlated with maternal vitamin A intake (r = 0.23, p < 0.05). The group with cod liver oil supplementation had significantly lower levels of gamma-tocopherol in breast milk (p < 0.01), whereas the supplementation did not affect other fat-soluble vitamins. CONCLUSION: The recommended intake of fat-soluble vitamins for lactating women can more easily be met with a cod liver oil supplementation than diet alone. Only vitamin D in human milk cannot meet the recommended intakes for infants, with normal breastfeeding. There is a relationship between the content of vitamins A and E in human milk and the maternal diet.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://www.karger.com/DOI/10.1159/000046737

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOlafsdottir, AS-
dc.contributor.authorWagner, KH-
dc.contributor.authorThorsdottir, I-
dc.contributor.authorElmadfa, I-
dc.date.accessioned2008-07-28T09:27:42Z-
dc.date.available2008-07-28T09:27:42Z-
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.date.submitted2008-07-28-
dc.identifier.citationAnn. Nutr. Metab. 2001, 45(6):265-72en
dc.identifier.issn0250-6807-
dc.identifier.pmid11786649-
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000046737-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/33334-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND/AIMS: To investigate lactating mothers' intake of fat-soluble vitamins in free-living subjects and to what extent cod liver oil supplementation influences the maternal intake in a population with common intake of cod liver oil. The impact of maternal diet on the concentration of fat-soluble vitamins in human milk was studied. METHODS: Dietary intake of 77 lactating women was investigated by 24-hour diet recalls and breast-milk samples were taken at the same occasions. Breast milk samples were analyzed for fat-soluble vitamins. RESULTS: The median intakes were 927 microg/day for vitamin A, 5.5 mg/day for vitamin E and 3.3 microg/day for vitamin D. Maternal vitamin A, E and D intakes were higher when the diet was supplemented with cod liver oil. Icelandic breast milk was found to have high contents of vitamin A and E. Only vitamin D was too low in breast milk to meet the recommended intake for infants. Retinylpalmitate in relation to lipids correlated with maternal vitamin A intake (r = 0.23, p < 0.05). The group with cod liver oil supplementation had significantly lower levels of gamma-tocopherol in breast milk (p < 0.01), whereas the supplementation did not affect other fat-soluble vitamins. CONCLUSION: The recommended intake of fat-soluble vitamins for lactating women can more easily be met with a cod liver oil supplementation than diet alone. Only vitamin D in human milk cannot meet the recommended intakes for infants, with normal breastfeeding. There is a relationship between the content of vitamins A and E in human milk and the maternal diet.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherKargeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.karger.com/DOI/10.1159/000046737en
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshCod Liver Oilen
dc.subject.meshDieten
dc.subject.meshDietary Supplementsen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen
dc.subject.meshLactationen
dc.subject.meshMental Recallen
dc.subject.meshMilk, Humanen
dc.subject.meshVitamin Aen
dc.subject.meshVitamin Den
dc.subject.meshVitamin Een
dc.subject.meshVitaminsen
dc.titleFat-soluble vitamins in the maternal diet, influence of cod liver oil supplementation and impact of the maternal diet on human milk composition.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUnit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali-University Hospital, University of Iceland, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalAnnals of nutrition & metabolismen

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