Mathematical models as tools for evaluating the effectiveness of interventions: a comment on Levin.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/33573
Title:
Mathematical models as tools for evaluating the effectiveness of interventions: a comment on Levin.
Authors:
Kristinsson, KG
Citation:
Clin. Infect. Dis. 2001, 33 Suppl 3:S174-9
Issue Date:
15-Sep-2001
Abstract:
Possible interventions to minimize resistance rates are numerous and can involve reduction and/or change in antimicrobial use, infection control, and vaccinations. As mathematical models are becoming more realistic they can be useful to quantitatively evaluate the relative contribution of individual risk factors and for the planning of future intervention strategies. The fitness cost associated with resistance is an important parameter and small differences can have a profound effect on the results. The mathematical models presented for communities predicted that even with cessation of antibiotic use, the decline in resistance frequency would be slow. This contrasts with successful interventions in Finland and Iceland. Future models have to include important variables such as herd immunity and take into account the heterogeneity of open communities. Provision of susceptible strains from areas with low resistance rates to areas with high resistance rates can have a profound effect on the success of interventions to minimize resistance.
Description:
To access full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink "View/Open" at the bottom of this page
Additional Links:
http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/321845

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKristinsson, KG-
dc.date.accessioned2008-07-29T11:32:21Z-
dc.date.available2008-07-29T11:32:21Z-
dc.date.issued2001-09-15-
dc.date.submitted2008-07-29-
dc.identifier.citationClin. Infect. Dis. 2001, 33 Suppl 3:S174-9en
dc.identifier.issn1058-4838-
dc.identifier.pmid11524716-
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/321845-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/33573-
dc.descriptionTo access full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink "View/Open" at the bottom of this pageen
dc.description.abstractPossible interventions to minimize resistance rates are numerous and can involve reduction and/or change in antimicrobial use, infection control, and vaccinations. As mathematical models are becoming more realistic they can be useful to quantitatively evaluate the relative contribution of individual risk factors and for the planning of future intervention strategies. The fitness cost associated with resistance is an important parameter and small differences can have a profound effect on the results. The mathematical models presented for communities predicted that even with cessation of antibiotic use, the decline in resistance frequency would be slow. This contrasts with successful interventions in Finland and Iceland. Future models have to include important variables such as herd immunity and take into account the heterogeneity of open communities. Provision of susceptible strains from areas with low resistance rates to areas with high resistance rates can have a profound effect on the success of interventions to minimize resistance.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Chicago Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/321845en
dc.subject.meshAnti-Bacterial Agentsen
dc.subject.meshDrug Resistance, Bacterialen
dc.subject.meshHospitalsen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMathematical Computingen
dc.subject.meshModels, Biologicalen
dc.subject.meshResidence Characteristicsen
dc.titleMathematical models as tools for evaluating the effectiveness of interventions: a comment on Levin.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Microbiology, National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. karl@rsp.isen
dc.identifier.journalClinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of Americaen

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