2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/3431
Title:
Violent behaviour among adolescents in Iceland: a national survey
Authors:
Gudlaugsdottir, Gerdur Run; Vilhjalmsson, Runar; Kristjansdottir, Gudrun; Jacobsen, Rune; Meyrowitsch, Dan
Citation:
Int J Epidemiol 2004, 33(5):1046-51
Issue Date:
2004
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Violence among adolescents may have serious developmental, physical, and mental health consequences for the affected individuals. In this study, we assessed the prevalence of violent behaviour and its correlates among 15-16 year old schoolchildren in Iceland. METHODS: In 1997, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among a random half of all Icelandic schoolchildren aged 15-16 years. The overall response rate was 91% (N = 3872). In the present study, socio-demographic background, social support, negative life events, psychological distress, and substance use were considered in relation to violent behaviour using logistic regression techniques. RESULTS: The majority of the respondents reported having committed violence within the last year. Boys were more likely to use violence than girls (odds ratio [OR] = 5.6; 95% CI: 4.7, 6.6). Respondents who had experienced >/=4 negative life events in the past year were more likely to use violence than respondents with no negative life events (OR = 3.0; 95% CI: 2.2, 4.2). Smokers were more likely than non-smokers to use violence (OR = 1.7; 95% CI: 1.2, 2.2), and adolescents who had used alcohol >20x in their lifetime were more than twice as likely to commit violence compared with those who had never used alcohol (OR = 2.5; 95% CI: 1.8, 3.4). CONCLUSION: Rates of violent behaviour among Icelandic schoolchildren were high. Gender, parental support, life stress, anger/aggression, and substance use were all significantly related to the perpetration of violent acts.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/33/5/1046

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGudlaugsdottir, Gerdur Run-
dc.contributor.authorVilhjalmsson, Runar-
dc.contributor.authorKristjansdottir, Gudrun-
dc.contributor.authorJacobsen, Rune-
dc.contributor.authorMeyrowitsch, Dan-
dc.date.accessioned2006-07-13T11:54:45Z-
dc.date.available2006-07-13T11:54:45Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationInt J Epidemiol 2004, 33(5):1046-51en
dc.identifier.issn0300-5771-
dc.identifier.pmid15319410-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ije/dyh190-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/3431-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Violence among adolescents may have serious developmental, physical, and mental health consequences for the affected individuals. In this study, we assessed the prevalence of violent behaviour and its correlates among 15-16 year old schoolchildren in Iceland. METHODS: In 1997, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among a random half of all Icelandic schoolchildren aged 15-16 years. The overall response rate was 91% (N = 3872). In the present study, socio-demographic background, social support, negative life events, psychological distress, and substance use were considered in relation to violent behaviour using logistic regression techniques. RESULTS: The majority of the respondents reported having committed violence within the last year. Boys were more likely to use violence than girls (odds ratio [OR] = 5.6; 95% CI: 4.7, 6.6). Respondents who had experienced >/=4 negative life events in the past year were more likely to use violence than respondents with no negative life events (OR = 3.0; 95% CI: 2.2, 4.2). Smokers were more likely than non-smokers to use violence (OR = 1.7; 95% CI: 1.2, 2.2), and adolescents who had used alcohol >20x in their lifetime were more than twice as likely to commit violence compared with those who had never used alcohol (OR = 2.5; 95% CI: 1.8, 3.4). CONCLUSION: Rates of violent behaviour among Icelandic schoolchildren were high. Gender, parental support, life stress, anger/aggression, and substance use were all significantly related to the perpetration of violent acts.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://ije.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/33/5/1046en
dc.subjectAdolescenten
dc.subjectAdolescent Behavioren
dc.subjectAlcohol Drinkingen
dc.subjectCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectIceland/epidemiologyen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectPrevalenceen
dc.subjectRisk Factorsen
dc.subjectSex Factorsen
dc.subjectSmokingen
dc.subjectSocial Supporten
dc.subjectViolenceen
dc.titleViolent behaviour among adolescents in Iceland: a national surveyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES-

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