Energy intake and growth of infants in Iceland-a population with high frequency of breast-feeding and high birth weight

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/34474
Title:
Energy intake and growth of infants in Iceland-a population with high frequency of breast-feeding and high birth weight
Authors:
Atladottir, H; Thorsdottir, I
Citation:
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000, 54(9):695-701
Issue Date:
1-Sep-2000
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: To investigate infants' energy intake and growth in a population with a high frequency of breast-feeding and high birth weight. DESIGN: The infants' consumption was recorded once a month from 1 to 12 months of age. At the ages of 2, 4, 6, 9 and 12 months all ingested food was weighed accurately to calculate nutrient intake. A control group participated at the age of 9 months. SETTING: Participants, who were born healthy, were recruited from four different maternity wards. Growth data were collected from healthcare centres and consumption data with parents' assistance from the infants' homes. SUBJECTS: Infants (n=250) were randomly selected and divided into a research group (n=180) and a control group (n=70). The research group participants numbered 138 (77%) and the control participants 57 (81%). RESULTS: Energy intake was lower than current recommendations but was similar to that found in recent studies. Growth, as a percentage of birth weight, correlated negatively with birth weight, with r=0.77 (P<0.001) for growth to 12 months. Infants breast-fed at 7 months of age gained less weight from 6 to 9 months, 1057+/-58 g, than those not breast-fed, 1498+/-130 g (P<0.001). Analysis of the control group's intake showed that participation in the study did not affect intake. CONCLUSION: The findings support the need for new recommendations on energy intake and new growth charts based on current knowledge about breast-fed infants. Birth weight is a determining factor of growth in infancy, and percentage weight gain during the first year of life increases as birth weight decreases. SPONSORSHIP: The Icelandic Research Council, The Research Fund of the University of Iceland, The Icelandic Nutrition Council, The Students' Innovation Fund, The Icelandic Dairy Marketing Board
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
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Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAtladottir, H-
dc.contributor.authorThorsdottir, I-
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-06T09:20:36Z-
dc.date.available2008-08-06T09:20:36Z-
dc.date.issued2000-09-01-
dc.date.submitted2008-07-06-
dc.identifier.citationEur J Clin Nutr. 2000, 54(9):695-701en
dc.identifier.issn0954-3007-
dc.identifier.pmid11002381-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/34474-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To investigate infants' energy intake and growth in a population with a high frequency of breast-feeding and high birth weight. DESIGN: The infants' consumption was recorded once a month from 1 to 12 months of age. At the ages of 2, 4, 6, 9 and 12 months all ingested food was weighed accurately to calculate nutrient intake. A control group participated at the age of 9 months. SETTING: Participants, who were born healthy, were recruited from four different maternity wards. Growth data were collected from healthcare centres and consumption data with parents' assistance from the infants' homes. SUBJECTS: Infants (n=250) were randomly selected and divided into a research group (n=180) and a control group (n=70). The research group participants numbered 138 (77%) and the control participants 57 (81%). RESULTS: Energy intake was lower than current recommendations but was similar to that found in recent studies. Growth, as a percentage of birth weight, correlated negatively with birth weight, with r=0.77 (P<0.001) for growth to 12 months. Infants breast-fed at 7 months of age gained less weight from 6 to 9 months, 1057+/-58 g, than those not breast-fed, 1498+/-130 g (P<0.001). Analysis of the control group's intake showed that participation in the study did not affect intake. CONCLUSION: The findings support the need for new recommendations on energy intake and new growth charts based on current knowledge about breast-fed infants. Birth weight is a determining factor of growth in infancy, and percentage weight gain during the first year of life increases as birth weight decreases. SPONSORSHIP: The Icelandic Research Council, The Research Fund of the University of Iceland, The Icelandic Nutrition Council, The Students' Innovation Fund, The Icelandic Dairy Marketing Boarden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen
dc.relation.urlhttp://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=3627209&site=ehost-liveen
dc.subject.meshBirth Weighten
dc.subject.meshBreast Feedingen
dc.subject.meshChild Developmenten
dc.subject.meshDietary Proteinsen
dc.subject.meshEnergy Intakeen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshInfant Nutrition Physiologyen
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshNutrition Policyen
dc.titleEnergy intake and growth of infants in Iceland-a population with high frequency of breast-feeding and high birth weighten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUnit for Nutrition Research, National University Hospital and Department of Food Science, University of Iceland, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of clinical nutritionen

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