Association between size at birth, truncal fat and obesity in adult life and its contribution to blood pressure and coronary heart disease; study in a high birth weight population.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/3454
Title:
Association between size at birth, truncal fat and obesity in adult life and its contribution to blood pressure and coronary heart disease; study in a high birth weight population.
Authors:
Gunnarsdottir, I; Birgisdottir, B E; Benediktsson, R; Gudnason, V; Thorsdottir, I
Citation:
Eur J Clin Nutr 2004, 58(5):812-8
Issue Date:
2004
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between size at birth and obesity as well as truncal fat, and its contribution to cardiovascular risk in a high birth weight population. DESIGN: Cohort-study with retrospectively collected data on size at birth. SETTING: Reykjavik, Iceland. SUBJECTS: A total of 1874 men and 1833 women born in Reykjavik during 1914-1935. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Size at birth. Adult weight, height and skinfold thickness measurements, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, fatal and nonfatal coronary heart disease (CHD). RESULTS: Birth weight was positively related to adult body mass index (BMI) in both genders (B=0.35+/-0.14 kg/m(2), adj. R(2)=0.015, P=0.012 and B=0.34+/-0.17 kg/m(2), adj. R(2)=0.055, P=0.043 in men and women, respectively). However, high birth weight was not a risk factor for adult obesity (BMI>/=30 kg/m(2)). In the highest birth weight quartile, the odds ratio (95% CI) for being above the 90th percentile of truncal fat was 0.7 (0.6-1.0, P=0.021) for men and 0.4 (0.3-0.8, P=0.002) for women, compared with the lowest birth weight quartile. Truncal fat and BMI were positively related to blood pressure in both genders (P<0.05), but not to CHD. The regression coefficient for the inverse association between birth weight and blood pressure hardly changed when adding truncal fat to the model. CONCLUSION: In this high birth weight population, high birth weight was related to higher BMI in adulthood without being a risk factor for adult obesity. The inverse association between birth weight and truncal fat in adulthood suggests a role for foetal development in determining adult fat distribution. The inverse relationship of birth weight to blood pressure seems not to be mediated through the same pathway as to truncal fat.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601881

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGunnarsdottir, I-
dc.contributor.authorBirgisdottir, B E-
dc.contributor.authorBenediktsson, R-
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, V-
dc.contributor.authorThorsdottir, I-
dc.date.accessioned2006-07-14T11:50:18Z-
dc.date.available2006-07-14T11:50:18Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationEur J Clin Nutr 2004, 58(5):812-8en
dc.identifier.issn0954-3007-
dc.identifier.pmid15116085-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601881-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/3454-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between size at birth and obesity as well as truncal fat, and its contribution to cardiovascular risk in a high birth weight population. DESIGN: Cohort-study with retrospectively collected data on size at birth. SETTING: Reykjavik, Iceland. SUBJECTS: A total of 1874 men and 1833 women born in Reykjavik during 1914-1935. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Size at birth. Adult weight, height and skinfold thickness measurements, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, fatal and nonfatal coronary heart disease (CHD). RESULTS: Birth weight was positively related to adult body mass index (BMI) in both genders (B=0.35+/-0.14 kg/m(2), adj. R(2)=0.015, P=0.012 and B=0.34+/-0.17 kg/m(2), adj. R(2)=0.055, P=0.043 in men and women, respectively). However, high birth weight was not a risk factor for adult obesity (BMI>/=30 kg/m(2)). In the highest birth weight quartile, the odds ratio (95% CI) for being above the 90th percentile of truncal fat was 0.7 (0.6-1.0, P=0.021) for men and 0.4 (0.3-0.8, P=0.002) for women, compared with the lowest birth weight quartile. Truncal fat and BMI were positively related to blood pressure in both genders (P<0.05), but not to CHD. The regression coefficient for the inverse association between birth weight and blood pressure hardly changed when adding truncal fat to the model. CONCLUSION: In this high birth weight population, high birth weight was related to higher BMI in adulthood without being a risk factor for adult obesity. The inverse association between birth weight and truncal fat in adulthood suggests a role for foetal development in determining adult fat distribution. The inverse relationship of birth weight to blood pressure seems not to be mediated through the same pathway as to truncal fat.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601881en
dc.subjectAbdomenen
dc.subjectAdipose Tissueen
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectBirth Weighten
dc.subjectBody Constitutionen
dc.subjectBody Mass Indexen
dc.subjectBody Weighten
dc.subjectCohort Studiesen
dc.subjectCoronary Diseaseen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectHypertension/epidemiology/*etiologyen
dc.subjectIceland/epidemiologyen
dc.subjectInfant, Newbornen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden
dc.subjectObesityen
dc.subjectResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'ten
dc.subjectRetrospective Studiesen
dc.subjectSkinfold Thicknessen
dc.titleAssociation between size at birth, truncal fat and obesity in adult life and its contribution to blood pressure and coronary heart disease; study in a high birth weight population.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of clinical nutritionen
dc.format.digYES-

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