Cerebral microbleeds in the population based AGES-Reykjavik study: prevalence and location.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/41761
Title:
Cerebral microbleeds in the population based AGES-Reykjavik study: prevalence and location.
Authors:
Sveinbjornsdottir, S; Sigurdsson, S; Aspelund, T; Kjartansson, O; Eiriksdottir, G; Valtysdottir, B; Lopez, O L; van Buchem, M A; Jonsson, P V; Gudnason, V; Launer, L J
Citation:
J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatr. 2008, 79(9):1002-6
Issue Date:
1-Sep-2008
Abstract:
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Incidental foci of signal loss suggestive of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are frequent findings on gradient echo T2* weighted MRI (T2* MRI) of patients with haemorrhagic or ischaemic stroke. There are few prevalence data on older populations. This paper reports on the prevalence and location of CMBs in a community based cohort of older men and women (born 1907-1935) who participated in the Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study, a population based cohort study that followed the Reykjavik Study METHODS: As part of the examination, all eligible and consenting cohort members underwent a full brain MRI, and blood was drawn for genotyping. Results are based on the first 1962 men (n = 820) and women (n = 1142), mean age 76 years, with complete MRI and demographic information available. RESULTS: Evidence of CMBs was found in 218 participants (11.1% (95% CI 9.8% to 12.6%)); men had significantly more CMBs than women (14.4% vs 8.8%; p = 0.0002, age adjusted). The prevalence of CMBs increased with age (p = 0.0001) in both men (p = 0.006) and women (p = 0.007). CMBs were located in the cerebral lobes (70%), the basal ganglia region (10.5%) and infratentorium (18.6%). Having a CMB was significantly associated with a homozygote Apo E epsilon4epsilon4 genotype (p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Cerebral microbleeds are common in older persons. The association with homozygote Apo E epsilon4 genotype and finding a relative predominance in the parietal lobes might indicate an association with amyloid angiopathy.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://jnnp.bmj.com/cgi/content/abstract/jnnp;79/9/1002

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSveinbjornsdottir, S-
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, S-
dc.contributor.authorAspelund, T-
dc.contributor.authorKjartansson, O-
dc.contributor.authorEiriksdottir, G-
dc.contributor.authorValtysdottir, B-
dc.contributor.authorLopez, O L-
dc.contributor.authorvan Buchem, M A-
dc.contributor.authorJonsson, P V-
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, V-
dc.contributor.authorLauner, L J-
dc.date.accessioned2008-12-03T10:50:06Z-
dc.date.available2008-12-03T10:50:06Z-
dc.date.issued2008-09-01-
dc.date.submitted2008-12-03-
dc.identifier.citationJ. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatr. 2008, 79(9):1002-6en
dc.identifier.issn1468-330X-
dc.identifier.pmid18270235-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jnnp.2007.121913-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/41761-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Incidental foci of signal loss suggestive of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are frequent findings on gradient echo T2* weighted MRI (T2* MRI) of patients with haemorrhagic or ischaemic stroke. There are few prevalence data on older populations. This paper reports on the prevalence and location of CMBs in a community based cohort of older men and women (born 1907-1935) who participated in the Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study, a population based cohort study that followed the Reykjavik Study METHODS: As part of the examination, all eligible and consenting cohort members underwent a full brain MRI, and blood was drawn for genotyping. Results are based on the first 1962 men (n = 820) and women (n = 1142), mean age 76 years, with complete MRI and demographic information available. RESULTS: Evidence of CMBs was found in 218 participants (11.1% (95% CI 9.8% to 12.6%)); men had significantly more CMBs than women (14.4% vs 8.8%; p = 0.0002, age adjusted). The prevalence of CMBs increased with age (p = 0.0001) in both men (p = 0.006) and women (p = 0.007). CMBs were located in the cerebral lobes (70%), the basal ganglia region (10.5%) and infratentorium (18.6%). Having a CMB was significantly associated with a homozygote Apo E epsilon4epsilon4 genotype (p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Cerebral microbleeds are common in older persons. The association with homozygote Apo E epsilon4 genotype and finding a relative predominance in the parietal lobes might indicate an association with amyloid angiopathy.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://jnnp.bmj.com/cgi/content/abstract/jnnp;79/9/1002en
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshApolipoprotein E4en
dc.subject.meshBasal Gangliaen
dc.subject.meshCerebral Hemorrhageen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshGenotypeen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imagingen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen
dc.titleCerebral microbleeds in the population based AGES-Reykjavik study: prevalence and location.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Neurology, Landspitali University Hospital, C12, Fossvogur, 108 Reykjavik, Iceland. sigurls@landspitali.isen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatryen

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