2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/4594
Title:
Cancer incidence among 10,211 airline pilots: a Nordic study
Authors:
Pukkala, Eero; Aspholm, Rafael; Auvinen, Anssi; Eliasch, Harald; Gundestrup, Maryanne; Haldorsen, Tor; Hammar, Niklas; Hrafnkelsson, Jon; Kyyrönen, Pentti; Linnersjö, Anette; Rafnsson, Vilhjalmur; Storm, Hans; Tveten, Ulf
Citation:
Aviat Space Environ Med 2003, 74(7):699-706
Issue Date:
1-Jul-2003
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Commercial airline pilots are exposed to cosmic radiation and other potentially carcinogenic elements during work and leisure activities. HYPOTHESIS: Work-related factors affect cancer pattern of the pilots. METHODS: A cohort of 10,051 male and 160 female airline pilots from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden was followed for cancer incidence through the national cancer registries. There were 177,000 person-years at follow-up, 51,000 of them accumulated after 20 yr since the time of first employment. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were defined as ratios of observed over expected numbers of cases based on national cancer incidence rates. Dose-response analyses were done with Poisson regression method. RESULTS: Among male pilots, there were 466 cases of cancer diagnosed vs. 456 expected. The only significantly increased SIRs concerned skin cancer: melanoma 2.3 (95% CI 1.7-3.0), squamous cell cancer 2.1 (1.7-2.8), and basal cell carcinoma 2.5 (1.9-3.2). The relative risk of skin cancers increased with the time since first employment, the number of flight hours, and the estimated radiation dose. There was an increase in the relative risk of prostate cancer with increasing number of flight hours in long-distance aircraft (p trend 0.01). No increased incidence was found for acute myeloid leukemia or brain cancer which were of interest a priori based on earlier studies. CONCLUSIONS: This large study, based on reliable cancer incidence data, showed an increased incidence of skin cancer. It did not indicate a marked increase in cancer risk attributable to cosmic radiation although some influence of cosmic radiation on skin cancer cannot be entirely excluded.
Additional Links:
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/search/article?author=hrafnkelsson&year_from=2001&year_to=2006&database=1&pageSize=20&index=4

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPukkala, Eero-
dc.contributor.authorAspholm, Rafael-
dc.contributor.authorAuvinen, Anssi-
dc.contributor.authorEliasch, Harald-
dc.contributor.authorGundestrup, Maryanne-
dc.contributor.authorHaldorsen, Tor-
dc.contributor.authorHammar, Niklas-
dc.contributor.authorHrafnkelsson, Jon-
dc.contributor.authorKyyrönen, Pentti-
dc.contributor.authorLinnersjö, Anette-
dc.contributor.authorRafnsson, Vilhjalmur-
dc.contributor.authorStorm, Hans-
dc.contributor.authorTveten, Ulf-
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-25T12:18:52Z-
dc.date.available2006-09-25T12:18:52Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-01-
dc.identifier.citationAviat Space Environ Med 2003, 74(7):699-706en
dc.identifier.issn0095-6562-
dc.identifier.pmid12862322-
dc.identifier.otherMAO12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/4594-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Commercial airline pilots are exposed to cosmic radiation and other potentially carcinogenic elements during work and leisure activities. HYPOTHESIS: Work-related factors affect cancer pattern of the pilots. METHODS: A cohort of 10,051 male and 160 female airline pilots from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden was followed for cancer incidence through the national cancer registries. There were 177,000 person-years at follow-up, 51,000 of them accumulated after 20 yr since the time of first employment. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were defined as ratios of observed over expected numbers of cases based on national cancer incidence rates. Dose-response analyses were done with Poisson regression method. RESULTS: Among male pilots, there were 466 cases of cancer diagnosed vs. 456 expected. The only significantly increased SIRs concerned skin cancer: melanoma 2.3 (95% CI 1.7-3.0), squamous cell cancer 2.1 (1.7-2.8), and basal cell carcinoma 2.5 (1.9-3.2). The relative risk of skin cancers increased with the time since first employment, the number of flight hours, and the estimated radiation dose. There was an increase in the relative risk of prostate cancer with increasing number of flight hours in long-distance aircraft (p trend 0.01). No increased incidence was found for acute myeloid leukemia or brain cancer which were of interest a priori based on earlier studies. CONCLUSIONS: This large study, based on reliable cancer incidence data, showed an increased incidence of skin cancer. It did not indicate a marked increase in cancer risk attributable to cosmic radiation although some influence of cosmic radiation on skin cancer cannot be entirely excluded.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAerospace Medical Associationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ingentaconnect.com/search/article?author=hrafnkelsson&year_from=2001&year_to=2006&database=1&pageSize=20&index=4en
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAge Distributionen
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAircraften
dc.subject.meshCausalityen
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen
dc.subject.meshDose-Response Relationship, Radiationen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFinlanden
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIceland/epidemiologyen
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms, Radiation-Induceden
dc.subject.meshOccupational Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshOccupational Exposureen
dc.subject.meshProstatic Neoplasmsen
dc.subject.meshRisken
dc.subject.meshScandinaviaen
dc.subject.meshSex Distributionen
dc.subject.meshSkin Neoplasmsen
dc.subject.meshWorkloaden
dc.subject.meshEpidemiologyen
dc.titleCancer incidence among 10,211 airline pilots: a Nordic studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES-

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