Conducting intervention research through the Cancer Information Service: a feasibility study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/4603
Title:
Conducting intervention research through the Cancer Information Service: a feasibility study
Authors:
Heidrich, Susan; Ward, Sandra; Julesberg, Karen; Miller, Nina; Donovan, Heidi; Gunnarsdottir, Sigridur; Davis, Sarah; Hughes, Susan; Serlin, Ronald C
Citation:
Oncol Nurs Forum 2003, 30(1):131-4
Issue Date:
25-Sep-2006
Abstract:
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To determine the feasibility of conducting trials of educational interventions regarding pain and quality of life (QOL) with people who call the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service (CIS). DESIGN: Descriptive. SETTING: North Central CIS, located at the University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center in Madison. SAMPLE: Callers to the North Central CIS who self-identified as people diagnosed with cancer or as family members or friends of people diagnosed with cancer were eligible. 102 people with cancer and 103 significant others answered questions concerning the feasibility of a pain study, and 101 significant others completed questions about the feasibility of a QOL study. METHODS: Eligible CIS callers were invited at the end of usual service to participate in a research study. Those who agreed were asked structured questions regarding pain or QOL. MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES: Response rate, length of time to complete recruitment, concerns about reporting pain and using analgesics, concerns about QOL, demographic variables, and willingness to join a hypothetical study. FINDINGS: The majority of callers had concerns about pain and QOL, and the vast majority (78%-89%) of participants indicated a willingness to join a future educational intervention study. CONCLUSIONS: Using subjects recruited through CIS, conducting trials of brief telephone interventions designed to help patients overcome barriers to pain management or assist families in addressing QOL concerns may be feasible. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Researchers may wish to consider the opportunities afforded by collaborating with CIS colleagues in planning and conducting studies of educational interventions.
Additional Links:
http://ons.metapress.com/content/y54423184151v43j

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHeidrich, Susan-
dc.contributor.authorWard, Sandra-
dc.contributor.authorJulesberg, Karen-
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Nina-
dc.contributor.authorDonovan, Heidi-
dc.contributor.authorGunnarsdottir, Sigridur-
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Sarah-
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Susan-
dc.contributor.authorSerlin, Ronald C-
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-25T13:51:12Z-
dc.date.available2006-09-25T13:51:12Z-
dc.date.issued2006-09-25T13:51:12Z-
dc.identifier.citationOncol Nurs Forum 2003, 30(1):131-4en
dc.identifier.issn1538-0688-
dc.identifier.pmid12515991-
dc.identifier.doi10.1188/03.ONF.131-134-
dc.identifier.otherONC12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/4603-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To determine the feasibility of conducting trials of educational interventions regarding pain and quality of life (QOL) with people who call the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service (CIS). DESIGN: Descriptive. SETTING: North Central CIS, located at the University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center in Madison. SAMPLE: Callers to the North Central CIS who self-identified as people diagnosed with cancer or as family members or friends of people diagnosed with cancer were eligible. 102 people with cancer and 103 significant others answered questions concerning the feasibility of a pain study, and 101 significant others completed questions about the feasibility of a QOL study. METHODS: Eligible CIS callers were invited at the end of usual service to participate in a research study. Those who agreed were asked structured questions regarding pain or QOL. MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES: Response rate, length of time to complete recruitment, concerns about reporting pain and using analgesics, concerns about QOL, demographic variables, and willingness to join a hypothetical study. FINDINGS: The majority of callers had concerns about pain and QOL, and the vast majority (78%-89%) of participants indicated a willingness to join a future educational intervention study. CONCLUSIONS: Using subjects recruited through CIS, conducting trials of brief telephone interventions designed to help patients overcome barriers to pain management or assist families in addressing QOL concerns may be feasible. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Researchers may wish to consider the opportunities afforded by collaborating with CIS colleagues in planning and conducting studies of educational interventions.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOncology Nursing Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://ons.metapress.com/content/y54423184151v43jen
dc.subject.meshComorbidityen
dc.subject.meshFeasibility Studiesen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInformation Servicesen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshNeoplasmsen
dc.subject.meshPainen
dc.subject.meshPatient Educationen
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen
dc.titleConducting intervention research through the Cancer Information Service: a feasibility studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalOncology nursing forumen
dc.format.digYES-

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